Manofmusic Index du Forum

Manofmusic
Espace consacré à David Bowie et à la Culture sous toutes ses formes

 FAQFAQ   RechercherRechercher   MembresMembres   GroupesGroupes   S’enregistrerS’enregistrer 
 ProfilProfil   Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privésSe connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés   ConnexionConnexion 

David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May
Aller à la page: 1, 2, 3  >
 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Jeu 27 Fév - 11:11 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant





27 FEBRUARY 2014

David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May

“I, I can remember, Standing by the wall”

The David Bowie exhibition will now visit Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, Germany, from 20 May until 10 August 2014, and you can read everything you need to know regarding the exhibition below.

With the latest addition of Berlin, the confirmed venues for the tour are:

Museum of Image and Sound, Sao Paulo, Brazil from 31 January to 20 April 2014
Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, Germany, from 20 May until 10 August 2014
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, USA from September 2014 to January 2015
Philharmonie de Paris/Cité de la Musique, Paris, France from 2 March to 31 May 2015
Groninger Museum, Groningen, The Netherlands from 15 December 2015 to 15 March 2016


THE WORLD’S FIRST RETROSPECTIVE OF THE POP AND STYLE ICON DAVID BOWIE COMES TO BERLIN

Tickets for the exhibition, which was curated by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, are now available at www.davidbowie-berlin.de

Berlin, 27.02.2014 - From 20 May until 10 August 2014, the international exhibition David Bowie will be shown at Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. This brings the spectacular show of the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), one of the most successful exhibitions in the long-standing history of the London museum, to the banks of the Spree River. The retrospective David Bowie creates a comprehensive audio-visual exhibition experience using multimedia technology at the most advanced technical level.

The Victoria and Albert Museum, London was given unprecedented access to the David Bowie Archive to curate the first international retrospective of the extraordinary career of David Bowie - one of the most pioneering and influential performers of modern times. The exhibition David Bowie explores the creative processes of Bowie as a musical innovator and cultural icon, tracing his shifting style and sustained reinvention across five decades.

The V&A’s Theatre and Performance curators, Victoria Broackes and Geoffrey Marsh selected more than 300 objects that were brought together for the very fi rst time. They include handwritten lyrics, original costumes, fashion, photography, fi lm, music videos, set designs, Bowie’s own instruments and album artwork.

David Bowie in Berlin
Due to Bowie’s close ties with the city, the exhibition’s station in Berlin is one of the highlights of its international tour. The Berlin years from 1976 to 1978 were among Bowie’s most productive ones. It was here that he made music history. The so-called “Berlin Trilogy” – which includes the albums Low (1977), Lodger (1979) and his magnum opus Heroes (1977) – was inspired by the capital and in part recorded at the Hansa Studios near Potsdamer Platz. Berlin provided Bowie and companions such as Iggy Pop the room to experiment with radical avant-garde personas. By fusing fashion, music and performance art, life and art merged into something entirely novel.

The city’s rich cultural past and the buzzing subcultures of the 1970s provided further inspiration. He was fascinated by the omnipresent historical forms of expression in architecture and art and felt particularly drawn to the artists of the Brücke movement. The famous lyrics of Heroes demonstrate how thoroughly he contemplated Berlin. The song is about two lovers who kiss at a wall. Here, Bowie processes his own observations and impressions of the 1920s Expressionism. In Berlin, Bowie also shot Just a Gigolo, the last film that featured Marlene Dietrich. An additional section was exclusively curated for the exhibition at Martin-Gropius-Bau and shows the profound connection between Bowie and Berlin.

The exhibition
The main focus is on the diversity of David Bowie’s work and the close interplay of various disciplines and modes of expression. His music and radical individualism were not only influenced by movements in art, fashion, design and contemporary culture, but Bowie left his own mark on them as well. The exhibition David Bowie retraces the career of this exceptional artist in great detail – from David Robert Jones’ early years as a young London artist until he became the global superstar Bowie. 60 stage costumes are presented, including the Ziggy Stardust jumpsuit designed by Freddie Burretti (1972), Kansai Yamamoto’s extravagant designs for the Aladdin Sane tour (1973) as well as the iconic Union Jack coat that Bowie designed together with Alexander McQueen for the album cover of Earthling (1997). Among the objects are also photographs by Brian Duffy, Terry O’Neill, Masayoshi Sukita, Helmut Newton, Herb Ritts and John Rowlands; album covers by Guy Peellaert and Edward Bell, clips from films and live concerts, including The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976) and Saturday Night Live (1979); music videos of such songs as Boys Keep Swinging (1979) and Let’s Dance (1983); the stage set for the Diamond Dogs tour (1974); unpublished storyboards, hand-written set lists and song lyrics, word collages as well as drawings, notes and diary entries from Bowie’s personal collection.

Additional information and tickets are now available at www.davidbowie-berlin.de.
The exhibition David Bowie was curated by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Curators: Victoria Broackes and Geoffrey Marsh, Department of Theater and Performance Organiser of the exhibition David Bowie in Berlin is Avantgarde, an international communication agency specialized in brand experiences. Besides offices in Berlin, Munich, Dresden and Cologne, Avantgarde runs offices in London, Paris, Moscow and 9 other international locations. In the cultural sector Avantgarde can count dOCUMENTA (13), Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden and Semperoper among its customers. Acting as a link between participating institutions and supporting companies Avantgarde realises the exhibition in Berlin and makes it accessible to a wide audience.

Special thanks goes to the official partners of the exhibition David Bowie: Sparkassen-Kulturfonds des Deutschen Sparkassen- und Giroverbandes, Audi, Kuhn & Bülow and Sennheiser. Exhibtion venue is the Martin-Gropius-Bau of the Berliner Festspiele.

About the V&A
The V&A is the world’s leading museum of art and design with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
It was established to make works of art available to all and to inspire British designers and manufacturers.
Today, the V&A’s collections, which span over 2000 years of human creativity in virtually every medium and from many parts of the world, continue to intrigue, inspire and inform. www.vam.ac.uk

Sound Experience by Sennheiser
The Sennheiser Group, with its headquarters in Wedemark near Hanover, Germany, is one of the world‘s leading manufacturers of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. In 2012 the family company, which was founded in 1945, achieved a turnover of around 584 million euros. Sennheiser employs more than 2,300 people worldwide, and has manufacturing plants in Germany, Ireland and the USA. The company is represented worldwide by subsidiaries in France, Great Britain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Germany, Denmark (Nordic), Russia, Hong Kong, India, Singapore, Japan, China, Canada, Mexico, the USA and now Australia and New Zealand. Also part of the Sennheiser Group are Georg Neumann GmbH, Berlin and the joint venture Sennheiser Communications A/S.

Audio guide
Visitors to David Bowie can immerse themselves in Bowie’s worlds of sound. The exhibition employs the latest audio technology which virtually merges image with sound. The audio guides from Sennheiser are included in the ticket price; they play the sound tracks that accompany the exhibits and integrate the audio material seamlessly into the tour of the exhibition.

David Bowie Archive
Costumes, materials and objects courtesy of the David Bowie Archive, with thanks to Archivist Sandy Hirshkowitz.

The David Bowie book
Accompanying the exhibition, the catalogue David Bowie will be published by Knesebeck Verlag, Munich.
Exclusively available at the shop of the exhibition.
The original edition with the title David Bowie is published by:
V&A Publishing, 2013
Victoria and Albert Museum
© The Board of Trustees of the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2013

Visitor service
info@davidbowie-berlin.de
030 484931 51
www.davidbowie-berlin.de

Exhibition venue
Martin-Gropius-Bau
Niederkirchnerstraße 7
10963 Berlin
www.gropiusbau.de

Opening hours
10.00 – 20.00 daily
No closing day
Cash desk closes at 19.15

Tickets
Adults: 14,00 €
Reduced Rate: 10,00 €
Free admission for children and teenagers up to the age of 16

Online-Tickets
The online-ticket, available at www.davidbowie-berlin.de, grants you direct access to the Martin-Gropius-Bau: no need to queue at the cash desk. Each online ticket bought is valid for a 15-minutes time slot within which you will be admitted to the exhibition.

Ticket service
www.davidbowie-berlin.de
ticket@davidbowie-berlin.de

davidbowie.com


Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Jeu 27 Fév - 11:11 (2014)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Jeu 27 Fév - 19:33 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant







Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Ven 18 Avr - 19:17 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



L'Hôtel de Rome
Credit Photo - ©DR



Sur les pas de David Bowie à Berlin

Le 23/04/2014

"Je ne sais pas quand je partirai d'ici, mais je vous promets que cela ne sera pas ennuyeux" disait David Bowie.

Pour célébrer la rétrospective David Bowie qui se déroulera du 20 mai au 10 août au Martin Gropius Bau, le luxueux cinq étoiles du groupe Rocco Forte, l'hôtel de Rome, s'associe au Berlin Musictours afin de proposer à ses invités une série de promenades et de visites pour suivre les pas de l’un des musiciens les plus emblématiques de Grande-Bretagne. Ses années berlinoises, de 1976 à 1978, ont été les plus productives. Sa trilogie, Low (1977), Heroes (1977) et Lodger (1979), lui a été inspirée par la ville et en partie enregistrée au sein du "Hansa Studios", non loin de la Potsdamer Platz.
Pour les fans qui voudraient vivre une totale immersion dans le monde de David Bowie, un « Bowie Berlin Tour » est fortement recommandé, par l''établissement qui vous aidera à tout bien planifier.

Le "Bowie Berlin Walk" : Une balade musicale à pied le long du Martin Grophius Bau. Tout au long de cette promenade, les clients visitent certains des lieux marquants de la vie berlinoise de Bowie et découvriront des infos ainsi que des anecdotes amusantes à son sujet.
 Disponible tous les jours, environ 1 heures 30 minutes.

Le "Bowie Berlin Tour" : Une visite en bus à travers le Berlin de Bowie, allant des légendaires studios d'enregistrement Hansa à l’appartement Schöneberg ainsi que tous ses lieux de prédilection, les lieux de tournage et les lieux de vie. Vous ne manquerez rien !
Des visites quotidiennes sont organisées pour des groupes de 2 personnes ou plus sur demande. La visite dure environ 3 heures.

Le "Hansa Studios Visite" : Une visite du plus célèbre studio d'enregistrement d’Allemagne, où David Bowie a écrit l'histoire de la musique. Ces visites sont organisées sur demande et sous réserve de disponibilité.

Tout cela devrait bien combler vos lacunes si vous en aviez !

MEN'S UP


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Lun 12 Mai - 18:59 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant





A Glimpse into David Bowie's Newly Expanded Berlin Exhibition
By Nadja Sayej

The last time we touched upon David Bowie, we traced his musical evolution through his hair. Now, Ziggy Stardust shines at the David Bowie exhibition, which has made its way from London to Berlin—just as Bowie did—adding a new bunch of stuff in Bowie’s city of inspiration.

Opening this week on May 20, the Martin Gropius Bau museum will showcase never-seen-before postcards between Bowie and Marlene Dietrich from 1978, original artwork by German expressionist Erich Heckel, secret police files from riots around Bowie’s concerts, and much more.

Some of Bowie’s best work was made in Berlin. The secret seems to have been his formula for finding a hideaway in West Berlin, where he wasn’t mobbed by fans (unlike in LA). He disappeared in the German capital and got working on the albums better known as the Berlin trilogy, Low (1977), Heroes (1977) and Lodger (1979), which were written and recorded in part in Berlin.

During his time in Berlin Bowie's avant-garde side emerged thanks to German minimalism, the city's fantastic museum selection and everything else that was going on at the time—including an amazing raft of friends and artists. The exhibition is filled with goodies from the Bowie archive with over 300 items, including handwritten lyrics, news clippings, photographs, and endless mannequins decked out in original Bowie costumes (sometimes you feel like you’re inside of a huge walk-in closet). To name a few there's the Ziggy Stardust jumpsuit by Freddie Burretti, the Kansai Yamamoto’s striped bodysuit from the Aladdin Sane tour from 1973 (which looks a lot like a Frank Stella painting), and the Alexander McQueen Union Jack coat from the cover of Earthling. While the show is heavy on style, retracing the career of a legend, the exhibition also included set designs, live footage, album artwork and of course, instruments.

Where to begin? Noisey spoke with Martin-Gropius-bau curator Christine Heidemann who dished about Bowie, Berlin, and the biggest challenge in putting a show like this together.




Bowie contact sheet circa Heroes.




Bowie and William Burroughs.


NOISEY: There is a special Bowie and Berlin room, which is new to the exhibition?
Christine Heidemann: When it was clear that they would come here, they decided to extend the section of the show about Bowie’s years in Berlin because they were so crucial for him. They asked me to curate this extension of the show. There has been a section of Bowie’s years in Berlin already, but it will be larger now. There is new stuff being added to the show.

What can we expect to see?
London's Victoria and Albert museum exhibitionfocused on Bowie’s three Berlin albums, Low, Lodger, and Heroes. I thought it would be interesting when you see the show here in Berlin if you could connect more to the city when you’re viewing the show. The Martin Gropius Bau museum as you arrive at Potzdamer Platz, that’s nearby where the Hansa Studios were, Bowie recorded some of his music there and it looked completely different in his day. I tried to focus on this and this is the motivation and inspiration that brought him here, as well as the places that were important for him while he was here in Berlin.

German expressionism was one main motivation for him to come to Berlin, we are so proud to show we are showing two works from the Brücke Museum here in Berlin. This is a real highlight. Bowiewent to the Brücke Museum a lot. He painted and drew while he was here. There are many paintings and drawings inspired by Bowie here, as well as traces of it in his Heroes cover. 
We are also showing a woodcut by Erich Heckel called Portrait of a Man. All the relations will become clear when you see the painting with the album covers.






Bowie's lyrics.


Bowie was pals with Marlene Dietrich, do you have anything to show their friendship?
Bowie and Dietrich were both in a film, Just a Gigolo, which was shot in Berlin and in Paris in 1978. It’s sad that they never actually met on set. Bowie was in Berlin, Dietrich was in Paris. They sent postcards to each other and we have some of those to show. They’ve never been shown.

What photos are shown?
We’re also showing a large collage of photos which come from the David Bowie archive, which were taken by friends like Coco Schwab when they were here. They also show David Bowie in Berlin and the places that were important for him, it’s like a mind map. It makes it easy to relate to certain places they see in the photos. They can discover them when they stop out of the museum, too.

What was it about Berlin that brought out his avant-garde personality?
Bowie lived in LA before moving here. He had a tough time. He was exhausted and it was a time when he took many drugs. This is not a focus on the show but it was a hard time for him. He needed a place to relax. It was Berlin. He had a connection to German expressionism and the golden 1920s. He was interested in Berlin in a very special and historical and political situation after the war. He imagined West Berlin as a quiet island where could relax where he could live a bit more in disguise or not as a superstar, as he did in LA.

What is a really memorable moment of Bowie in Berlin?
There is going to be a focus on one concert from 1987 which was a big concert in front of the Reichstag with different bands like Genesis and David Bowie, who sang "Heroes," people listened to it from the other side of the Wall. It was a really big concert. It was the 750 year anniversary of Berlin which was mainly celebrated in West Berlin and many people were coming to Brandenburg Gate from the other side, East Berlin. There were some riots on the east side and it shows how important Berlin stayed for Bowie when he left and didn’t live here anymore. It was an impressive event in the history of Berlin. There will be material from the GDR secret police, the Stasi. It’s not directly on Bowie but on all the things that occurred on the concert that happened on the Eastern side, TV reports talking about the concert and those sorts of things. This brings it away from just the 1970s.







Bowie has always had ties to fashion, what was it that made him an icon?
There are a lot of costumes, his suit from Thin White Duke and other stuff. The focus is a lot on fashion and David Bowie and a character and a figure who is constantly changing.

For those of us who haven’t seen it yet, what’s the main focus of the show?
The main focus is on the 1970s and 1980s. It’s a very special show on the things you hear, in particular. You walk around the show with headphones. You hear interviews, explanations of certain objects, you hear songs, films, and there is the film Where Are We Now? It is not only about the past. [Laughs]. This is the main thing.

What was the biggest challenge in putting this exhibition together?
For me, the biggest challenge was to not only add something but to add a dialogue to something that is already there. It’s an extension of the show, but more Berlin-specific, so the city is an important aspect. The show in general focuses on Bowie as a person in a hundred disguises, but I wanted the surrounding to be more visible and to make it possible to connect more with the city.

The Stasi files are incredible!
On one hand they’re super boring, super bureaucratic style. It was just two years before the Wall came down. Bowie’s concert was one week before Ronald Regan told Gorbachev “Mr. Gorbachev, take down this Wall.” It was a time when many things were moving.

The David Bowie exhibition opens at Martin-Gropius-bau in Berlin from May 20 to August 10, 2014, tickets here. It continues on to Chicago and Paris in 2015, if you’re looking way ahead.

Noisey.Vice




A model of the stage set for the Diamond Dogs tour 1974.




Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Jeu 15 Mai - 07:39 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant





14 MAY 2014

David Bowie is nearly in Berlin

“Any day now”

Less than a week to go. Got your tickets?

davidbowie.com


Revenir en haut
Domi


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 28 Avr 2011
Messages: 53
Localisation: Paris

MessagePosté le: Jeu 15 Mai - 08:33 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant

son immeuble berlinois donnait sur une voie rapide; bonjour le  bruit Shocked ; je dirais une construction des années 30, mais pas certain,vu que Berlin a été quasiment détruit pendant la guerre...

Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Jeu 15 Mai - 18:42 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant


Berlin exhibition tells story of David Bowie's 'Heroes' years
Thursday, 15 May 2014 - 5:30pm IST | Agency: Reuters

David Bowie's intensely productive Berlin period - when he made the iconic albums "Heroes" and "Low", launched Iggy Pop's solo career and kicked a drug habit - is the theme of a new show adapted from last year's sold-out exhibition in London.

Arriving in 1976 from Los Angeles, exhausted from his antics as "Ziggy Stardust" and other stage personae, he shed the glam-rock outfits and big hair for a more anonymous life documented at Berlin's Martin Gropius Bau, an extended version of the show that broke box-office records at the Victoria & Albert Museum.

"If people saw him in a bar in Berlin they would just say: 'So what? I play in a band too'. Bowie liked that, there were no screaming fans and he wasn't treated like a superstar," recalls Peter Radszuhn, who worked at Berlin's Hansa Studios where Bowie recorded and is now director of music at Berlin's Radio Eins.

But in the company of the irrepressible Iggy and surrounded by the louche attractions of West Berlin, it was never going to be a monastic existence.

As photos on display show, Bowie was re-living the bohemian pre-war Berlin described by his friend Christopher Isherwood in books that would inspire the musical "Cabaret".

Fascinated by the intense paintings and cinema of German Expressionism, Bertolt Brecht's theatre and the city's Cold War landscape, he and his collaborator Brian Eno blended the sounds of Krautrock, electronic and punk for some of Bowie's most-covered tracks, as well as some brooding and obscure ones.

The Berlin era was so influential that Bowie has described the records he made here as "my DNA". By the end of his stay, the chameleon-like artist was moving in a different direction with the pop sounds of the 1979 album "Lodger".

But he again paid homage to the city in his acclaimed 2013 comeback album "The Next Day", produced like the Berlin trilogy by Toni Visconti.

Recycling artwork from the cover of "Heroes" and listing his old haunts, like the nightclub Dschungel, it provides a soundtrack for fans who are expected to flock to the city for the new show.

Christine Heidemann, who curated the Berlin extension to the V&A exhibition - which puts the fashion iconoclast's outrageous costumes in the context of his musical output and inspirations -searched the archives of the rock star, his friends, museums and public records to present new material about his time here.

Alongside photos, sketches and scribbled lyrics to his hits, she hangs portraits painted by Bowie of Iggy alongside a woodcut and oil by Expressionist master Erich Heckel. They inspired the odd angular poses on the cover of "Heroes" and Iggy's "The Idiot", one of his two raw 1977 hit albums produced by Bowie.

Heidemann also discovered correspondence between Bowie and the ageing German screen idol Marlene Dietrich. They co-starred in the 1978 film "Just a Gigolo", her last film appearance which was panned by the critics.

She also sifted through archives of the former East German secret police, the Stasi, for reports related to his 1987 return to Berlin, when he sang "Heroes" by the Wall - provoking a riot by thousands of fans on the other side risking arrest to listen.

The Berlin Wall appears in the lyrics of the single "Heroes" which was recorded near the Gropius Bau at the studio known then as "Hansa Studio by the Wall" - it was so close that East German sentries could see right into the windows from their watchtower.

Guiding visitors through recording studios used by a chart-list of legends - U2, Nina Hagen, Nick Cave and Depeche Mode - Thielo Schmied of Fritz MusicTours tells the story of how Bowie spotted his producer Visconti kissing one of the backing singers in the scruffy backyard beneath the Wall.

In the song, about two lovers, Bowie sings: "I can remember/Standing, by the wall/And the guns shot above our heads/And we kissed, as though nothing could fall".

Heidemann, who had Bowie's melancholic Berlin-themed 2013 single "Where Are We Now?" echoing in her head as she researched the show, said Berlin has changed a lot since Bowie's stay, and not only because the Wall came down.

"But people come here with similar expectations - that Berlin is a place where you can somehow relax or retreat, which is what Bowie expected when he came here after a turbulent time in Los Angeles," she said amid frantic work before the opening on May 20. "It's a place where you can be very creative."

(Reporting by Stephen Brown; Editing by John Stonestreet)

DNA


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Ven 16 Mai - 13:07 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



A variety of stage costumes worn by musician David Bowie are seen at the ''David Bowie is'' Exhibition
at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Picture: REUTERS / NEIL HALL



Berlin exhibition tells Bowie's story
Friday 16 May 2014 - 7:21am

LONDON - David Bowie's intensely productive Berlin period -- when he made the iconic albums "Heroes" and "Low", launched Iggy Pop's solo career and kicked a drug habit -- is the theme of a new show adapted from last year's sold-out exhibition in London.

Arriving in 1976 from Los Angeles, exhausted from his antics as "Ziggy Stardust" and other stage personae, he shed the glam-rock outfits and big hair for a more anonymous life documented at Berlin's Martin Gropius Bau, an extended version of the show that broke box-office records at the Victoria & Albert Museum.

"If people saw him in a bar in Berlin they would just say: 'So what? I play in a band too'. Bowie liked that, there were no screaming fans and he wasn't treated like a superstar," recalls Peter Radszuhn, who worked at Berlin's Hansa Studios where Bowie recorded and is now director of music at Berlin's Radio Eins.

But in the company of the irrepressible Iggy and surrounded by the louche attractions of West Berlin, it was never going to be a monastic existence.

As photos on display show, Bowie was re-living the bohemian pre-war Berlin described by his friend Christopher Isherwood in books that would inspire the musical "Cabaret".

Fascinated by the intense paintings and cinema of German Expressionism, Bertolt Brecht's theater and the city's Cold War landscape, he and his collaborator Brian Eno blended the sounds of Krautrock, electronic and punk for some of Bowie's most-covered tracks, as well as some brooding and obscure ones.

The Berlin era was so influential that Bowie has described the records he made here as "my DNA". By the end of his stay, the chameleon-like artist was moving in a different direction with the pop sounds of the 1979 album "Lodger".

But he again paid homage to the city in his acclaimed 2013 comeback album "The Next Day", produced like the Berlin trilogy by Toni Visconti.

Recycling artwork from the cover of "Heroes" and listing his old haunts, like the nightclub Dschungel, it provides a soundtrack for fans who are expected to flock to the city for the new show.

Christine Heidemann, who curated the Berlin extension to the V&A exhibition -- which puts the fashion iconoclast's outrageous costumes in the context of his musical output and inspirations -- searched the archives of the rock star, his friends, museums and public records to present new material about his time here.

Alongside photos, sketches and scribbled lyrics to his hits, she hangs portraits painted by Bowie of Iggy alongside a woodcut and oil by Expressionist master Erich Heckel.

They inspired the odd angular poses on the cover of "Heroes" and Iggy's "The Idiot", one of his two raw 1977 hit albums produced by Bowie.

-Reuters

eNCA


Revenir en haut
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Sam 17 Mai - 01:37 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant

Trouvé "ça" bien que je ne sache pas trop ce que c'est...
http://www.zitty.de/page/impressum.html



_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Lun 19 Mai - 09:05 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



A painting by David Bowie at the David Bowie exhibition in Berlin. Photos: Tobias Schwarz/Reuters


Monday, May 19, 2014, 00:01 by Stephen Brown, Reuters
Berlin exhibition tells story of Bowie’s Heroes years
British star inspired by art, music and shadow of Berlin Wall

David Bowie’s intensely productive Berlin period – when he made the iconic albums Heroes and Low, launched Iggy Pop’s solo career and kicked a drug habit – is the theme of a new show adapted from last year’s sold-out exhibition in London.

Arriving in 1976 from Los Angeles, exhausted from his antics as Ziggy Stardust and other stage personae, he shed the glam-rock outfits and big hair for a more anonymous life documented at Berlin’s Martin Gropius Bau, an extended version of the show that broke box-office records at the Victoria & Albert Museum.

“If people saw him in a bar in Berlin they would just say: ‘So what? I play in a band too.’ Bowie liked that, there were no screaming fans and he wasn’t treated like a superstar,” recalls Peter Radszuhn, who worked at Berlin’s Hansa Studios where Bowie recorded and is now director of music at Berlin’s Radio Eins.

But in the company of the irrepressible Iggy and surrounded by the louche attractions of West Berlin, it was never going to be a monastic existence.

As photos on display show, Bowie was reliving the bohemian pre-war Berlin described by his friend Christopher Isherwood in books that would inspire the musical Cabaret.

Fascinated by the intense paintings and cinema of German Expressionism, Bertolt Brecht’s theatre and the city’s Cold War landscape, he and his collaborator Brian Eno blended the sounds of Krautrock, electronic and punk for some of Bowie’s most-covered tracks, as well as some brooding and obscure ones.

The Berlin era was so influential that Bowie has described the records he made here as “my DNA”. By the end of his stay, the chameleon-like artist was moving in a different direction with the pop sounds of the 1979 album Lodger.

But he again paid homage to the city in his acclaimed 2013 comeback album The Next Day, produced like the Berlin trilogy by Toni Visconti.

Recycling artwork from the cover of Heroes and listing his old haunts, like the nightclub Dschungel, it provides a soundtrack for fans who are expected to flock to the city for the new show.

Christine Heidemann, who curated the Berlin extension to the V&A exhibition, searched the archives of the rock star, his friends, museums and public records to present new material about his time here. Alongside photos, sketches and scribbled lyrics to his hits, she hangs portraits painted by Bowie of Iggy alongside a woodcut and oil by Expressionist master Erich Heckel. They inspired the odd angular poses on the cover of Heroes and Iggy’s The Idiot, one of his two raw 1977 hit albums produced by Bowie.

Heidemann also discovered correspondence between Bowie and the ageing German screen idol Marlene Dietrich. They co-starred in the 1978 film Just a Gigolo, her last film appearance which was panned by the critics.

She also sifted through archives of the former East German secret police, the Stasi, for reports related to his 1987 return to Berlin, when he sang Heroes by the Wall – provoking a riot by thousands of fans on the other side risking arrest to listen.



The Ziggy Stardust jumpsuit designed by Freddie Burretti (1972) is reflected in the mirrors of an installation at the exhibition.


The Berlin Wall appears in the lyrics of the single Heroes which was recorded near the Gropius Bau at the studio known then as Hansa Studio by the Wall – it was so close that East German sentries could see right into the windows from their watchtower.

Guiding visitors through recording studios used by a chart-list of legends – U2, Nina Hagen, Nick Cave and Depeche Mode – Thielo Schmied of Fritz MusicTours tells the story of how Bowie spotted his producer Visconti kissing one of the backing singers in the scruffy backyard beneath the Wall.

In the song, about two lovers, Bowie sings: “I can remember/Standing, by the wall/And the guns shot above our heads/And we kissed, as though nothing could fall.”

Heidemann said Berlin has changed a lot since Bowie’s stay, and not only because the Wall came down: “But people come here with similar expectations – that Berlin is a place where you can somehow relax or retreat, which is what Bowie expected when he came here after a turbulent time in Los Angeles.”

Times of Malta


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Mar 20 Mai - 11:05 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



David Bowie exhibition at Martin-Gropius Museum in Berlin. Photo: DPA


David Bowie is back in Berlin

Published: 19 May 2014 13:15 GMT+02:00
Updated: 19 May 2014 13:15 GMT+02:00


The international exhibition that spans David Bowie's career across five decades opens its doors to the public this Tuesday at Martin-Gropius-Museum in Berlin.

Curated by the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), “David Bowie Is” is the fastest-selling exhibition shown by the London museum. The curators, Victoria Broackes and Geoffrey Marsh, have selected more than 300 objects that explore and document the singer's creative and musical odyssey, together with his many different artistic personas such as Ziggy Stardust.

Among the objects on display are original costumes, instruments, music videos, fashion, handwritten lyrics and set designs.

David Bowie lived in Berlin from 1976 to 1978, where he wrote and recorded the successful Heroes album, part of the Berlin Trilogy – Low, Heroes and Lodger, at the legendary Hansa Studios.

A special Berlin version of the exhibition has been curated for the German staging of "David Bowie Is", with an additional 60 objects from the “Berlin Years”.





Although short, the time he spent in Berlin is often viewed as the most innovative and productive period of his career.

Showcasing objects and photos from that era, the exhibition takes the visitor on a colourful and creative journey through Bowie's Berlin. Influenced by the vibrant Berlin nightlife, he drew on his experiences and the energy from Berlin's clubbing scene and his artistic friends, including Iggy Pop, as he broke boundaries with fashion, music and art.

The title song of Heroes was inspired by a doomed romance in the shadows of the Berlin Wall. As Bowie watched the lovers kissing under a watchtower, he penned the song which was to become his Berlin anthem and one of his best-loved songs.





In addition to the exhibition, dedicated Bowie fans can also take a music tour the Bowie Berlin Walk during the exhibition's run. The musical tour takes a journey around past the Hansa Studios, through Potsdamer Platz, Checkpoint Charlie and to Platz der Republik in front of the Reichstag, where he held an outdoor concert in June 1987.

“David Bowie Is” will be officially opened by foreign minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier on Monday and open to the public from Tuesday. The exhibition will run until August 10th.

Julie Colthorpe

The Local


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Mar 20 Mai - 11:06 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



"Unser Film sieht glänzend aus." Marlene Dietrich und David Bowie haben einander verehrt.
Doch ein Treffen gestaltete sich schwierig.
© DPA - Terry O'Neill/Hulton Archive/Getty Images



David Bowie und Marlene Dietrich
20. Mai 2014, 10:00 Uhr

Die Diva und der Gigolo

Große Überraschung: Marlene Dietrich und David Bowie haben einander Briefe geschrieben. Einige davon wurden nun wiederentdeckt und sind in der Berliner Bowie-Ausstellung zu sehen. Von Anja Lösel

Als sie die Briefe in den Händen hielt, wusste sie sofort: Das ist eine Sensation. Eigentlich hatte Christine Heidemann in der Kinemathek am Potsdamer Platz nur nach ein paar Fotos für die große David-Bowie-Ausstellung gesucht. Doch dann stieß die Berliner Kuratorin plötzlich auf Original-Briefe von David Bowie, adressiert an eine Person, die er ganz besonders verehrte: Marlene Dietrich.

"Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo" heißt der fast vergessene Film, in dem Marlene Dietrich und David Bowie 1978 gemeinsam auftraten. Er spielt einen feschen Kerl im Berlin der 20er Jahre, der davon lebt, ältere Damen zum Tanz zu verführen und manchmal auch zu mehr. Sie gibt die geheimnisvolle Diva mit knallrot geschminkten Lippen - ihre letzte Rolle überhaupt. Das Ganze ist angelehnt an Erich Kästners Roman "Fabian". Ein etwas kurioser und wirrer Streifen, der trotz der beiden Superstars in den Kinos floppte.

Immerhin lernten die deutsche Diva und der britische Popstar sich damals kennen, sollte man meinen. War aber nicht so. Obwohl Marlene und Bowie im selben Film zu sehen sind, trafen sie sich nicht ein einziges Mal. Denn Marlene mochte nicht mehr reisen, schon gar nicht nach Deutschland. Sie setzte durch, ihren Part in Paris spielen zu dürfen, während Bowie in Berlin vor der Kamera stand.

Das Kokain aus dem Kopf kriegen
1976 war Bowie hierher geflohen, weil er Drogenprobleme hatte und auf dieser seltsamen Insel West-Berlin zur Ruhe kommen wollte. Er aß Steak mit Kartoffeln und begeisterte sich für die expressionische Malerei von Erich Heckel. Mit dem Fahrrad fuhr er ins Brücke-Museum nach Dahlem, um das Kokain aus dem Kopf zu bekommen. Von den Gemälden ließ er sich zu seinen Plattencovers anregen. Wahrscheinlich hat die Stadt ihm das Leben gerettet.

In Berlin-Schöneberg, Hauptstraße 155, mietete Bowie sich eine Altbauwohnung. Damals war das eine öde, graue Gegend. "Ich fahre jeden Tag dran vorbei", sagt Christine Heidemann, "unten ist ein Tattoostudio". Manchmal stehen Leute vor dem Haus, die die Eingangstür fotografieren und einen Blick ins Treppenhaus erhaschen wollen. Der Bowie-Zauber wirkt immer noch.

"My deepest love and respect"
Und was steht nun drin in den Briefen? "Die beiden schrieben einander vor allem, wie sehr sie sich gegenseitig verehrten und schätzten", sagt Christine Heidemann. "Sie diskutierten nicht das politische Weltgeschehen." Immer wieder geht es darum, wann sie sich endlich einmal treffen könnten.

Unterwegs in Detroit schreibt Bowie an Marlene, wie grau und traurig alles um ihn herum ist. "Ich hoffe, Sie in Amerika zu treffen", erklärt Marlene im April 1978, obwohl sie doch gar nicht ans Reisen denken mag. "Unser Film sieht glänzend aus", schreibt Bowie zurück.

Einmal ist er ihr sogar ganz nah. Seine Tournee hat ihn nach Paris geführt, aus seinem Hotel schickt er ihr eine Karte, er wohnt "natürlich im Plaza" - genau gegenüber von Marlenes Wohnung. Und bezeugt ihr in schwungvoll-schöner Schrift "my deepest love and respect".

Trotzdem klappt es nicht mit dem Treffen. Man schwärmt sich weiterhin aus der Ferne an, Marlene schnippelt Artikel über Bowie aus der Zeitung und hebt sie auf. Sie muss ihn sehr gemocht haben. Wie so viele.

Das Sofa aus dem Dschungel
Die können Bowie nun in der Berliner Schau ganz nah sein. Mit perfektem Sound auf dem Kopfhörer taucht man ein in Bowies Musik, bewundert seine Kostüme, Videos und Plattencover. Ein Sonderteil zur Berliner Zeit des Popstars zeigt kuriose Ausstellungsstücke wie das verschlissene Samtsofa aus dem "Dschungel". Und Filmaufnahmen von DDR-Polizisten, die 1987 während des Bowie-Konzerts vor dem Reichstag versuchen, Ostberliner Fans von der Mauer wegzudrängen.

In London, wo die Schau im vergangenen Sommer zu sehen war, strömten 311.000 Besucher ins ehrwürdige Victoria & Albert Museum. Ein Rekord. Könnte sein, dass es auch in Deutschland voll wird. Berlin und Bowie - das war schon immer eine Liebesgeschichte.

Martin-Gropius-Bau, 20. Mai bis 10. August, täglich von 10 bis 20 Uhr. Tickets: davidbowie-berlin.de

stern.de


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Mar 20 Mai - 11:26 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



Une des salles de l'exposition. Photo Johannes Eisele / AFP


Découvrir les années de David Bowie à Berlin

Kate Millar
20-05-2014 | 02h00

BERLIN - Une grande exposition consacrée à David Bowie s'installe à Berlin, la rétrospective plébiscitée à Londres augmentée d'un chapitre sur ses années passées dans la ville, à la fin des années 70, une période majeure dans la carrière du musicien.

C'est dans la ville divisée de la Guerre froide que l'auteur de Ziggy Stardust retrouva l'inspiration, composant notamment Heroes, un de ses albums les plus marquants.

Le manuscrit raturé de la chanson-titre de cet album, qui raconte l'histoire d'un couple se rencontrant devant le Mur de Berlin, une lettre écrite à Marlene Dietrich ou encore des peintures que Bowie réalisa à l'époque et qui l'aidèrent à abandonner la drogue font partie des quelque 60 objets ajoutés à l'exposition londonienne, retraçant les «années berlinoises» de l'auteur-compositeur.

Cette présentation multimédia, inaugurée lundi par le ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères Frank-Walter Steinmeier, s'est installée au Musée Martin Gropius, un bâtiment construit sous l'empereur Guillaume 1er pour abriter ses collections d'art décoratif, et que longeait le Mur.

«Bowie sans Berlin, ça ne marche pas», a souligné lors d'une conférence de presse Martin Roth, directeur du Victoria and Albert Museum de Londres où fut montée l'exposition originale.

Pour Victoria Broackes, une des commissaires de l'exposition londonienne, Berlin «semblait correspondre» à la personnalité de Bowie.

Elle rappelle l'intérêt de ce féru d'histoire pour la République de Weimar (1919-1933) mais aussi «sa soif de découvertes et d'innovations», nourrie par son amour de la scène culturelle berlinoise et de ses avatars underground des années 70.

«C'est ici qu'il a semblé échapper à ses démons et à son vide créatif pour offrir une nouvelle jeunesse à son inspiration», a-t-elle dit.

Au milieu des costumes extravagants de l'artiste, l'exposition explore son parcours dans la ville, ses influences, raconte ses rencontres.

1976. Usé par la gloire, accroc à la cocaïne, Bowie alias David Robert Jones débarque en provenance de Los Angeles dans un Berlin-Ouest encore balafré par les traces de la guerre. À son départ, trois ans plus tard, il aura composé une trilogie d'albums révolutionnaires: Low, Lodger et l'emblématique Heroes, enregistré dans les studios Hansa, et aboli les frontières entre mode, musique et performance artistique.

«C'est une ville dans laquelle il est si facile de se perdre... Mais aussi de se trouver», a dit l'artiste à propos de Berlin, dans une interview datant de 2001.

Entre autres curiosités, l'exposition montre les tableaux qui ont inspiré la pochette de Heroes, des oeuvres du peintre Erich Heckel, figure de l'expressionnisme allemand qui plaisait tant au chanteur britannique. Ces mêmes tableaux dont Iggy Pop, compère de Bowie à Berlin, offrit lui-aussi une variation photographique pour illustrer son propre album The Idiot en 1977.

Le visiteur peut également découvrir des extraits - inédits - de la correspondance entretenue en 1978 entre Bowie et l'actrice Marlene Dietrich, avec laquelle il tourna le film Just a Gigolo ou encore des rapports de la police secrète de RDA, la Stasi, évoquant le risque que de jeunes Allemands de l'Est tentent de s'approcher du Mur pour mieux entendre un concert de la star, devant le Reichstag, côté Berlin-Ouest, en 1987.

Même un banc, provenant de l'un des repaires berlinois de Bowie, «Dschungel» (la Jungle), a trouvé sa place au Martin Gropius.

Silencieux pendant plusieurs années, le chanteur a renoué le fil de son histoire d'amour avec Berlin en sortant l'an passé un titre surprise à l'occasion de son 66e anniversaire. Where are we Now? (Où sommes-nous à présent ?) égrène les souvenirs de l'artiste, associés à des noms de lieux symboles de la ville.

Celle-ci lui rend d'ailleurs volontiers son affection, voyant fièrement en Bowie l'un des ambassadeurs qui ont su faire découvrir le visage cool de ce qui était à l'époque un ilot capitaliste perdu derrière le Rideau de fer. «Son aura demeure perceptible», soulignait d'ailleurs récemment le quotidien berlinois TAZ.

Les «années berlinoises» font partie de la légende Bowie. Et aujourd'hui, le touriste peut même suivre la visite guidée qui retrace les pas de la star, dans la désormais capitale de l'Allemagne.

Canoë


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Mar 20 Mai - 11:36 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant



David Bowie-Ausstellung eröffnet in Berlin
In Berlin gibt eine Ausstellung jetzt umfassend Einblick in das Leben der 67-jährigen britischen Musiklegende David Bowie. Im Martin-Gropius-Bau werden ab Dienstag mehr als 300 handschriftliche Texte, Originalkostüme, Fotografien, Filme und Musikvideos von der Legende zu sehen sein. Ein ganz besonderer Teil widmet sich natürlich Bowies Zeit in der Hauptstadt. In der Zeit von 1976 bis 1978 entstand in Berlin nämlich sein legendäres Album „Heroes". Die Ausstellung hat schon zuvor zahlreiche begeisterte Besucher in das Viktoria and Albert Museum in London gelockt. „Bowie ohne Berlin geht nicht", sagte der Londoner Museumsdirektor Martin Roth am Montag.




Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Mar 20 Mai - 12:32 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May Répondre en citant





19 MAY 2014

Los hitos de la carrera de David Bowie llegan a Museo de Berlín

Fotos, vestuario, pinturas y objetos del legendario músico se exhiben en el Museo Martin Gropius-Bau de la ciudad que lo acogió en los 70'.

por EFE - 19/05/2014 - 17:18

La vida del polifacético y legendario músico británico David Bowie llega desde mañana al museo Martin Gropius-Bau de Berlín, a través de una muestra llena de piezas únicas, que amplía la exitosa exposición presentada un año atrás en Londres con material procedente de la etapa que pasó en la capital alemana el artista londinense.

En total son 300 objetos, cuidadosamente seleccionados entre un total de 75.000 piezas relacionadas con la trayectoria del camaleónico artista, los que forman un recorrido multimedia que refleja todas las facetas del autor de Space Oddity durante más de cinco décadas.





Una fotografía del cantante junto a la batería de su primer grupo "The Kon-rads", manuscritos de sus canciones, un autorretrato simulando la portada de su álbum "Heroes" o la guitarra acústica con la que tocó "Space Oddity" son algunos de los objetos que harán las delicias de los aficionados al fundamental artista.

Los más fetichistas disfrutarán también con 60 atuendos que en algún momento lució en los escenarios y que están presentes en la exhibición, como el traje futurista con el que grabó Ashes to Ashes en la década del ochenta o el vestuario con el que encarnó a su alter ego, Ziggy Stardust.





La muestra cuenta además con una sección especial dedicada a Berlín, ciudad donde el artista pasó una temporada a finales de los setenta para desintoxicarse y sumergirse en la escena musical de la capital alemana, la que inspiró sus aclamados álbumes Low, Heroes y Lodger.

Así lo atestiguan las llaves de su apartamento en la calle Hauptstrasse, que compartía en ese periodo con el también músico y compañero de andanzas Iggy Pop, y que se exhiben en la muestra.

Ya el año pasado esta misma exposición vendió 50.000 entradas anticipadas en su inauguración en Londres en el museo Victoria & Albert, un récord en la historia del museo.





"David Bowie es algo así como la banda sonora de nuestras vidas, que se mantiene en este mundo cambiante", aseguró hoy el director del museo de Londres Martin Roth, presente en la inauguración berlinesa.

Y es que la cara andrógina cruzada por un rayo que ilustra el álbum Aladdin sane (1973), desafía el tiempo y las modas, a pesar de los diez años de silencio que llevaba el artista y que se interrumpieron en marzo del año pasado, cuando sorprendió a público y crítica con The Next Day, su último trabajo hasta la fecha.

La exposición quedó inaugurada por el ministro de Asuntos Exteriores, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, y estará abierta al público desde mañana y hasta el próximo 10 de agosto.

La Tercera


Revenir en haut
Contenu Sponsorisé






MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 08:39 (2016)    Sujet du message: David Bowie exhibition reaches Berlin in May

Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 1 Heure
Aller à la page: 1, 2, 3  >
Page 1 sur 3

 
Sauter vers:  

Index | Panneau d’administration | creer un forum gratuit | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com