Manofmusic Index du Forum

Manofmusic
Espace consacré à David Bowie et à la Culture sous toutes ses formes

 FAQFAQ   RechercherRechercher   MembresMembres   GroupesGroupes   S’enregistrerS’enregistrer 
 ProfilProfil   Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privésSe connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés   ConnexionConnexion 

An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie
Aller à la page: 1, 2, 3  >
 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 093

MessagePosté le: Mer 20 Fév - 22:11 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant





An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie

Source: The List (Issue 709)
Date: 20 February 2013
Written by: Hamish Brown

As a new album is released and a V&A retrospective opens, we look back on the pop legend's career

There’s a telling scene in Shut Up and Play the Hits, the recent documentary of the last days of LCD Soundsystem, following James Murphy’s decision to split the band at the height of their success. US talk show host Stephen Colbert gives him a playful ‘What the hell were you thinking?’ talk for walking away from rock star fame, but further interviews with Murphy during the film are so littered with David Bowie references that it becomes clear that this deliberate, sudden change goes beyond something he deems necessary for a better future. This is Murphy’s version of killing off Ziggy Stardust. When Bowie retired his breakthrough alter-ego at a 1973 farewell concert at the Hammersmith Odeon, it was merely the first of several reinventions in a career that has since become defined by them.

As encouraging as it is to imagine others taking inspiration from David Bowie’s hopscotch career trajectory – jumping off bandwagons as others jump on or, in collaborator Brian Eno’s words, ‘ducking the momentum of a successful career’ – the reality is that for most artists, success is the biggest argument against exploring territory other than their current one.

Sure, doing more of whatever works might seem to make sense in the short-term, but eclecticism can be a cannier move; reach a whole new audience, while retaining your loyal fanbase: so the theory goes. It’s an approach that’s worked for Bowie, whose career is now lengthy enough at 49 years to have influenced several generations of artists.

The gushing Bowie-love on Twitter that met out-of-the-blue track ‘Where Are We Now?’ – dubbed by one user as ‘an elaborate way to apologise for not performing at the Olympics’ – was a reminder of his sizeable presence in our cultural consciousness.

Historically, one reason that any new Bowie music has always been an event is because it always promises to be different. His shifting sources of inspiration and ever-changing line-up of collaborators are two of many reasons behind a vibrant diversity of output arguably unmatched in pop music, an artform he’s often credited with bringing sophistication to. For biographer David Buckley, the essence of Bowie’s contribution is ‘his outstanding ability to analyse and select ideas from outside the mainstream – from art, literature, theatre and film – and to bring them inside, so that the currency of pop is constantly being changed.’

Citing broad, cultured reference points might be compulsory for your discerning art-rocker these days, but how many follow through on them to the extent Bowie has? A self-confessed ‘fan’, he’s also seemingly not content to leave it at that. His use of fashion as an integral part of his work is celebrated in the upcoming V&A retrospective, featuring iconic work by designers and photographers Masayoshi Sukita and Kansai Yamamoto. He’s also had a healthier painting career than many who call themselves painters, with dozens of exhibitions filled with work that commands respectable prices.

Well-known for introducing theatrical elements into his live shows, he’s no tourist there either, having trained with acclaimed mime choreographer Lindsay Kemp in 1969 and played the title role in The Elephant Man on Broadway in 1980. Similarly, his screen acting CV includes lead parts with directors Nic Roeg in The Man Who Fell to Earth, Tony Scott in The Hunger and Nagisa Oshima in Merry Christmas, Mr Lawrence, and everyone has their personal favourite of his countless cameos.

Of course, his journey to icon status might just be down to luck and timing. Like many artists who rose to prominence between the mid-60s and the 90s, his career has fallen within the arc of popular music’s own coming-of-age. Certainly, the pop world that produced Bowie and other Mojo cover star ‘heritage’ acts doesn’t exist anymore in the fragmented music landscape of today. Yet, his influence is everywhere.

Perversely, nobody has worked harder than Bowie himself to combat this tendency to over-mythologise, preferring to confound rather than simply meet audience expectations, especially when engaging with his own back catalogue. It’s not always successful – few fans would consider his 1996 jungle reworking of The Man Who Sold the World as essential – but the spirit of innovation is a permanent fixture. Even the front cover of new album The Next Day – essentially a one-minute MS Paint makeover of 1977’s Heroes sleeve – references dealing with the past, and perhaps the inability of others to let him progress beyond his.

Despite decades of hits behind him, Bowie has never traded opportunistically on former glories and has always made a point of having something new to say. As explored at length in Simon Reynolds’ Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction to its Own Past, a glance at any live music listings will attest to the popularity of ‘legacy’ acts. Often (but not always) these tribute bands are authenticated by members of the original line-up, who are prisoners of both their back catalogue and the audience’s demand that they hear those hits on their own terms.

In fact, perhaps Bowie’s success and our ongoing affection for him best illustrates that we crave the very opposite of this comfort for the familiar. Even when we think we want more of the same, what we might actually desire is something completely different.

’David Bowie is’, a retrospective of Bowie’s career opens at the V&A, London, Sat 23 Mar. Bowie’s new album The Next Day is out Mon 11 Mar. Filmhouse, Edinburgh presents ‘Planet Bowie’, with screenings of Bowie films, including The Hunger, Labyrinth and Christiane F from 10 Mar–4 Apr.

The List


Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Mer 20 Fév - 22:11 (2013)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 12:07 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:49 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 129
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 13:16 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

avcsar a écrit:
...le bouquin de Nietzsche "Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra",  aussi appellé "Zardust" et "Zoroaster" en grec, signifiant of course "poussière d'étoile"...





Où as -tu vu ou lu cette traduction/ signification ?  


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 13:48 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

-----

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:49 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 129
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 14:04 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

mouais , enfin je sais que Bowie est allé chercher son Pseudo dans la mythe du Western -Rezin Bowie aka  Jim Bowie et que Stardust lui a été inspiré par le pseudo de  Norman Carl Odam / the Legendary stardust cowboy c'est plus terre à terre comme explication mais ce sont les siennes  Wink


  


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 14:14 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:50 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Diamond Duke


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Jan 2013
Messages: 159

MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 16:03 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

@ avcsar

J'ai beaucoup de mal à te suivre !
Tu dis que "Labyrinth" est très bon (tu parles du film ? Des chansons ? Du look de Jareth ? De la craquante Jennifer Connelly ?)... et "Reality" pire que "Never Let Me down" (??!!).

Sur les tournées successives, je ne me prononce pas (il faudrait les avoir suivies toutes, ou les avoir vues en vidéo).
Mais sur les albums, comme je l'ai dit, moi perso, je préfère "Reality" à "Heathen" (je dois bien être le seul, apparemment... Sur "Heathen", j'aime beaucoup "Sunday", mais le reste n'est pas du grand Bowie) : sur "Reality", "New Killer Star", "Pablo Picasso", "Never Get Old", "Try Some, Buy Some" sont superbes... les autres titres sont, il est vrai, un peu faiblards.
ça n'en fait donc pas un mauvais album, loin de là.

Pour "Never Let Me Down", Bowie disait que les compositions étaient bonnes, mais que le disque était mal produit.
ça m'est arrivé, en écoutant l'album, de le trouver bon... enfin, bon, non... disons, sympa.

Les chansons de "Labyrinth", c'est de la pop sucrée consensuelle comme il s'en faisait beaucoup à l'époque (et parfois, c'était pas si mal : "The Bangles", c'est très rafraîchissant, une sorte de "Mamas & The Papas" des années 80).
"Magic Dance" et "Chilly Down" de Bowie, ça a un petit côté Prince assez jouissif, je dois avouer.

Quant à Tin Machine, c'est assez faible au niveau des compositions, mais ça annonce la vague Nirvana.
Bref, on peut toujours défendre (un peu) le Bowie des années 80 si on est un fan hardcore.

J'ai beaucoup de mal avec la dérive commerciale qu'il a eu ces années-là... mais on ne comprend pas cette dérive si on ne sait pas qu'il a été complètement escroqué dans les années 70 : il est ressorti des années 70 sans avoir gagné une seule thune !
J'ai beau ne pas attacher beaucoup d'imprtance à l'argent, je l'aurais sans doute eu très mauvaise à sa place !
Donc, je comprends la démarche qu'il a suivi dans les années 80 (même si je la déplore un peu).


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 16:40 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

-----

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:50 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 16:52 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

-------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:51 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 129
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 17:04 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

je sens que l' on va dériver vers çà   Mr. Green
=> http://www.webring.org/l/rd?ring=bowieweb;id=209;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eparareligion%2Ech%2F2010%2Fbowiegrail%2Ehtm
=> http://www.parareligion.ch/bowie.htm


Revenir en haut
Diamond Duke


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Jan 2013
Messages: 159

MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 17:29 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

@ avcsar

J'avais déjà parlé de "Reality" et noté les deux reprises dont tu parles... mais j'avais dit également que tout "Pin Ups" n'est composé que de reprises, et que j'étais preneur et enthousiaste.
Certaines versions sont même meilleures que les originales (enfin, pour moi) : je pense à "See Emily Play", notamment (toute la dernière partie du morceau, la batterie et le ou les violons, ce côté chaotique et dément, c'est un ajout de Bowie, on ne trouve pas ça dans la version de Pink Floyd, une minute plus courte).
"Sorrow", Bowie a complètement cannibalisé le morceau : tout le monde a oublié la version originale, c'est devenu du Bowie pur jus.

J'adore également "It's Hard to be a saint in the city", la reprise de Bowie (moi qui trouve Bruce Springsteen complètement lourdingue, une sorte de Johnny Hallyday américain... Je suis méchant là, hé, hé !!).

A l'inverse, j'ai toujours pensé que les artistes qui reprenaient les chansons de Bowie n'étaient pas capables de faire oublier les versions originales.
(Certaines reprises sont même catastrophiques, mais mieux vaut ne pas en parler ici : écouter "Absolute Beginners" de Carla Bruni et se flinguer !!).
Deux exceptions toutefois : "The Man Who Sold The World" de Nirvana, reprise complètement bouleversante, supérieure à la version de Bowie.
Et le tout récent (et mégalomaniaque) "Sound and Vision" de Beck.

Bon, sinon, pour revenir à ce que je disais, il se trouve que j'ai vu pour la première fois "Labyrinth" ces dernières années (il y a un an ou deux).
Dans les années 80, j'étais gosse, "Dark Crystal" est l'un des rares films que j'ai vu au cinéma : j'avais été ébloui (en tant que gosse, je précise bien).
J'ai voulu le revoir ces dernières années... pas du tout par nostalgie... mais pour le voir avec mes yeux d'adulte, voir ce que le film valait réellement.
Je ne l'ai pas trouvé très bon, je l'ai trouvé un peu enfantin, en fait.
Tu vas penser que je suis difficile (ou critique) parce qu'il s'agit d'un film (a priori) pour enfants.
Eh bien, en fait, non : je trouve que certains films de Hayao Miyazaki sont vraiment extraordinaires, je pense notamment à "Princesse Mononoké", "Le voyage de Chihiro" et "Le château ambulant".
Dans le genre folie furieuse onirique, c'est digne des plus grands Fellini ("Roma", "Amarcord", "Casanova"...).
Et Miyazaki, tout auteur de dessins animés pour enfants qu'il soit, est un pur génie (même si je suis plus réservé sur ses films des années 80... et même si, sans doute, un film comme "Le voyage de Chihiro" plaît sans doute beaucoup plus aux adultes qu'aux tout petits).

Bref, "Labyrinth", sans trouver ça complètement honteux, j'ai trouvé ça moins bien que "Dark Crystal"... et somme toute, on est assez loin de la richesse d'un Miyazaki.

En fait, je pense que Bowie aurait pu faire des choses fabuleuses au cinéma... mais la plupart du temps, il est étrangement absent.
Bob Geldof disait que les rocks stars sont de piètres acteurs au cinéma... ajoutant que Bowie pouvait être très bon, mais qu'il avait besoin d'un public.
(Faisait-il allusion au rôle d'Elephant Man de Bowie sur les planches, car paraît-il que Bowie était très bon ?).

C'est dommage, car Bowie a quand même tourné avec des grands : David Lynch (un tout petit rôle, hélas), Scorsese (là aussi un tout petit rôle dans un film qui n'est pas un grand Scorsese), et Christopher Nolan (là encore un petit rôle où Bowie brille par son absence... Je précise que je ne suis pas du tout admiratif de la trilogie Batman de Nolan, en revanche, j'adore "Memento" et "Inception"... et Nolan est un cinéaste qui fera de grandes choses à l'avenir, je pense... à condition qu'il arrête les films de super héros).

Sinon, je crois que Bowie était fan de Fassbinder (Fassbinder, cinéaste auquel j'ai un rapport très complexe : je trouve ses films intéressants, même si je les trouve tous plus ou moins bâclés : 42 films entre 1969 et 1982, dont un feuilleton de 15 heures... Sur la même période, Kubrick n'a fait que 3 films... mais 3 films parfaits, surhumains, "Orange Mécanique", "Barry Lyndon" et "Shining").
Je pense que ces deux-là auraient dû travailler ensemble : Bowie est le personnage viscontien par excellence (je ne parle pas de Tony Visconti, mais de l'immense Luchino Visconti), et il aurait peut-être été génial chez Fassbinder.
Bowie qui, comme chacun sait, s'est inspiré de Genet... Genet adapté par Fassbinder avec le très baroque et flamboyant "Querelle".


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 18:15 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

-------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:49 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
tom


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 21 Sep 2011
Messages: 331
Localisation: Auvergne

MessagePosté le: Jeu 21 Fév - 21:19 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

Diamond Duke a écrit:

@ avcsar

J'ai beaucoup de mal à te suivre !
Tu dis que "Labyrinth" est très bon (tu parles du film ? Des chansons ? Du look de Jareth ? De la craquante Jennifer Connelly ?)... et "Reality" pire que "Never Let Me down" (??!!).

Sur les tournées successives, je ne me prononce pas (il faudrait les avoir suivies toutes, ou les avoir vues en vidéo).
Mais sur les albums, comme je l'ai dit, moi perso, je préfère "Reality" à "Heathen" (je dois bien être le seul, apparemment... Sur "Heathen", j'aime beaucoup "Sunday", mais le reste n'est pas du grand Bowie) : sur "Reality", "New Killer Star", "Pablo Picasso", "Never Get Old", "Try Some, Buy Some" sont superbes... les autres titres sont, il est vrai, un peu faiblards.
ça n'en fait donc pas un mauvais album, loin de là.

Pour "Never Let Me Down", Bowie disait que les compositions étaient bonnes, mais que le disque était mal produit.
ça m'est arrivé, en écoutant l'album, de le trouver bon... enfin, bon, non... disons, sympa.

Les chansons de "Labyrinth", c'est de la pop sucrée consensuelle comme il s'en faisait beaucoup à l'époque (et parfois, c'était pas si mal : "The Bangles", c'est très rafraîchissant, une sorte de "Mamas & The Papas" des années 80).
"Magic Dance" et "Chilly Down" de Bowie, ça a un petit côté Prince assez jouissif, je dois avouer.

Quant à Tin Machine, c'est assez faible au niveau des compositions, mais ça annonce la vague Nirvana.
Bref, on peut toujours défendre (un peu) le Bowie des années 80 si on est un fan hardcore.

J'ai beaucoup de mal avec la dérive commerciale qu'il a eu ces années-là... mais on ne comprend pas cette dérive si on ne sait pas qu'il a été complètement escroqué dans les années 70 : il est ressorti des années 70 sans avoir gagné une seule thune !
J'ai beau ne pas attacher beaucoup d'imprtance à l'argent, je l'aurais sans doute eu très mauvaise à sa place !
Donc, je comprends la démarche qu'il a suivi dans les années 80 (même si je la déplore un peu).


Sur Heathen, la meilleure chanson est Heathen (the rays) loin devant.
Reality je l'ai écouté une fois ; complètement vide et son franchement pas terrible (j'espère que celui de the next day sera différent - j'ai un peu peur)
Never Let me down inécoutable (le "rap" de Mickey rourke !!!) et c'est pour ça que je voulais en faire une reprise intégrale piano solo (je n'ai fait que Zeroes) me disant qu'il valait mieux s'attaquer au pire (NLMD) qu'au meilleur (Low...).
Tonight : que dire ? Loving est à peu près au niveau le reste je ne sais pas (je ne l'ai pas écouté depuis 1984).
Tin machine : j'avais aimé le premier (sorte de blues grunge) et détesté le second (rock fm)
Pin ups : jamais écouté en entier.
Diamond dogs : je sais que beaucoup aiment ici mais pas moi. C'est musicalement poussif (j'attends vos réactions !)
Low : son chef d'oeuvre.
Young americans de plus en plus haut dans mon estime.
Station : j'aimais mieux avant (je m'en lasse - le son à part TVC 15).
Lodger : pas trop accroché. Je suis curieux d'écouter le remixage si ça se fait.
Scary Monsters : peut-être celui que j'ai le plus écouté. It's no game (1) quelle claque ! up the hill, Fashion, Ashes ouah !
Let's dance. Il est de bon ton de le descendre aujourd'hui mais j'avoue que j'avais adoré. Je le trouvais dans une suite logique de son parcours : un album / un look / un son.
Heroes : je n'aime pas les instrumentaux (bien inférieurs à ceux de Low) mais adore la "face a". Joe the lion une de mes chansons préférées de Bowie.


Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 129
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Ven 22 Fév - 09:37 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

ça va Tom , on va pas te crucifier . Mr. Green
Je suis d'accord , Diamond dogs est inégal , il y a  ce qui qui sonne comme les  R Stone et que je n'aime pas particulièrement sur cet album mais qui fait taper du pied.
mais il y a tout de même : Sweet thing canditate sweet thing / we are the dead / 1984 ( revampe de shaft de Isacc Hayes) / Big Brother  -Chant of the Ever Circling Skeletal Family

et il y a les outtakes : Candidate (v2) et Dodo 




Revenir en haut
Cygnet


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 10 Jan 2013
Messages: 28
Localisation: Paris

MessagePosté le: Ven 22 Fév - 15:22 (2013)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie Répondre en citant

Tom >
En ce qui concerne Heathen, j'apprécie particulièrement les 5 premières chansons + Heathen. Mais bon, j'aime bien le reste de l'album aussi !
Reality, plusieurs personnes m'ont dit qu'elles préféraient cet album à Heathen... Du coup ça m'a fait réfléchir, je l'ai réécouté ... C'est vrai qu'il est très bon, j'avais été marqué négativement par la chanson titre que je trouve inaudible, mais les 4 premières + Bring me the disco king sont vraiment très bonnes. A côté y en a qui sont vraiment pas terrible, comme "Looking for Water".
Never Let Me Down ... Evidemment par rapport au reste de sa discographie, c'est assez médiocre. Mais j'aime beaucoup la chanson titre, et je trouve que Bang Bang a de bonnes sonorités, même si artistiquement, on est proche du 0.
Tonight ... Je trouve la plupart des chansons assez bien foutues, mais bon, c'est de la musique commerciale, c'est sûr. Dans les bonus, je trouve Absolute Beginners excellente, par contre !
Tin Machine ... C'est pas mal, mais il n'y a pas beaucoup de chansons qui sortent du lot. Surtout dans le 2ème album (à part You Belong in rock N roll).
Pins Up : je rejoins Diamond Duke en ce qui concerne Sorrow. Mais le reste de l'album ne m'a pas beaucoup marqué (Port of Amsterdam est bien, mais à part la traduction, je vois pas bien l'apport de Bowie).
Diamond Dogs : C'est vraiment un album cohérent, je trouve, et j'apprécie. Du coup, c'est difficile de sortir un titre du lot. D'ailleurs, y a une autre version de candidate (mais y a juste le titre en commun, pas du tout la même composition) qui est vraiment pas mal, je trouve.
Low : le meilleur de la collaboration Bowie/Eno, c'est dire. Album très homogène ET de très bonnes qualités. C'est rare. Je crois que ma préférée est "All Saints", qui a été ajoutée dans des rééditions, il me semble.
Young americans, c'est très bon, je trouve certains outtakes même supérieurs à certaines chansons de l'album (cover de "It's Hard to Be a Saint in The City" ; "After Today")
Station to Station : un sans faute. L'album parfait ? Surprised
Lodger : J'ai fini par bien apprécier cet album. Notamment "Repetition".
Scary Monsters : Tu n'as pas parlé de Teenage Wildlife, Tom ! Shocked J'aime beaucoup Because You're Young aussi ... et tout le reste de l'album Very Happy
Let's Dance : C'est pas trop mon truc, mais ça rend plutôt bien. Et puis China Girl est vraiment pas mal du tout, quand même !
Heroes : j'aime bien les instrumentaux mais je trouve qu'ils sont très proches les uns des autres. Si je devais en choisir un, ce serait "V2 Schneider". A part ça, Joe The Lion et la chanson titre, évidemment ...

Je rajouterais aussi l'extended play "Baal", que je trouve vraiment très bon.


Revenir en haut
Contenu Sponsorisé






MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 20:46 (2016)    Sujet du message: An in-depth look at the career of David Bowie

Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 1 Heure
Aller à la page: 1, 2, 3  >
Page 1 sur 3

 
Sauter vers:  

Index | Panneau d’administration | creer un forum gratuit | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com