Manofmusic Index du Forum

Manofmusic
Espace consacré à David Bowie et à la Culture sous toutes ses formes

 FAQFAQ   RechercherRechercher   MembresMembres   GroupesGroupes   S’enregistrerS’enregistrer 
 ProfilProfil   Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privésSe connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés   ConnexionConnexion 

Bowie 2013 - revue de presse
Aller à la page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  >
 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Lun 25 Fév - 20:27 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

--------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:12 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Lun 25 Fév - 20:27 (2013)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Lun 25 Fév - 21:06 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant



The cover for The Next Day, by designer Jonathan Barnbrook, plays on the iconic cover of 1977's "Heroes"


David Bowie album review - track by track: The Starman pulls off the greatest comeback album in rock'n'roll history with The Next Day

Andy Gill listens to Bowie’s first album in a decade – The Next Day (Iso/Columbia) – and says it’s as good as anything he’s ever made

Andy Gill
Monday 25 February 2013

Recorded over the past two or three years in complete secrecy, and heralded by the sudden appearance in January of the single “Where Are We Now?”, David Bowie’s The Next Day may be the greatest comeback album ever.

It’s certainly rare to hear a comeback effort that not only reflects an artist’s own best work, but stands alongside it in terms of quality, as The Next Day does. The fact that producer Tony Visconti has worked with Bowie since the Seventies undoubtedly helps cement the connection with his earlier work – there are constant frissons of recognition while listening to these songs, as if Bowie is deliberately mining memories. That notion is reinforced by the typically artful cover, which takes the original sleeve for the “Heroes” album and partly obscures its image with a simple sans-serif font title panel and, on the rear, a similarly blunt track listing, making the new album a sort of palimpsest of history.

But if the design and sound suggest a link with the past, the songs – save for “Where Are We Now?” – are all about today, as might be expected from such an astute barometer of societal and cultural mores as Bowie. Visconti has suggested in interviews that some songs, notably the title track, were prompted by the singer’s recent immersion in books about medieval history; but whatever their origins, the songs seem to refract elements of the modern day, offering sometimes brutal commentaries on contemporary events.

And there’s a sleek, muscular modernity about the arrangements, mostly recorded with such Bowie stalwarts as guitarist Gerry Leonard, bassist Gail Anne Dorsey and drummer Zachary Alford, with telling contributions from rock guitarist Earl Slick and avant-rock soundscape guitarist David Torn. The result is an album that conveys, with apt anxiety or disgust, the fears and troubles of a world riven by conflict and distracted by superficial celebrity.

Track-by-track verdicts


The Next Day

Supposedly written about some medieval tyrant, the title track employs a stalking funk-rock groove striated with angular, trebly guitars and bound to marching strings to depict a figure pursued by a baying mob who “can’t get enough of that doomsday song” and who can “work with Satan while they dance like saints”. The trace of Johnny Rotten in Bowie’s delivery reveals the underlying bitterness of a situation which, inevitably, doesn’t end well: “Here I am, not quite dying, my body left to rot in a hollow tree.”


Dirty Boys

A slow, jerky trudge of brusque, visceral guitars and rudely honking baritone sax, this finds Bowie musing about living “something like Tobacco Road” and heading off to “Finchley Fair” in search of excitement, however guttersnipe-low: “When the die is cast and we have no choice, we will run with dirty boys.”


The Stars (Are Out Tonight)

The second single from the album features another nervy, angst-ridden vocal, as Bowie reflects on the eternal status of celebrity, noting, “The stars are never sleeping/Dead ones and the living.” The gently scudding groove is one of the album’s most absorbing, laced with strings, clarinet and Visconti’s descending recorder line lurking behind the guitars. Contains some of Bowie’s best lines in ages, particularly his warning of the dangerous magnetism of stars who “burn you with their radium smiles and trap you with their beautiful eyes”.


Love Is Lost

“Oh what have you done, what have you done?” wails an abject Bowie over a soundbed whose bitter guitar, organ and plodding bass lend a fatalistic slant to a broadside at someone whose possessions are new, “...but your fear is as old as the world.”


Where Are We Now?

The acclaimed single stands apart from the rest of The Next Day: rather than brusque and angry in tone, it’s a piece of almost oceanic melancholy. An enervated reflection on Bowie’s Berlin days, it’s full of references to his favourite haunts, viewed through a veil of watery, reverbed guitars like misted eyes, while the subtle touches of autotuning give the voice a delicate fragility appropriate to the ruminations of “a man lost in time... just walking the dead.”


Valentine’s Day

The earliest track recorded for The Next Day, this has nothing to do with 14 February, but rather offers a mocking depiction of a bitter nobody who may well have “gone postal” against the more popular kids at school, couched in one of the album’s most engaging pop arrangements.


If You Can See Me

From one of its most appealing songs to its most antagonistic, a hurried bustle of noise featuring a piercing keyboard monotone at nerve-shredding pitch. Another song seemingly inspired by Bowie’s recent fascination with medieval history, this bowls along pell-mell, a torrent of impressionistic lines and threats from an invader who “will take your lands...slaughter your beasts...I am the spirit Greed”.


I’d Rather Be High

Set to a jazzy shuffle bound with a sinuous guitar line, this finds one of the poor bloody infantry regretting the youthful wrong turn that led him to his embattled foxhole: “I’d rather be flying, I’d rather be dead, than out of my head and training these guns on those men in the sand.”


Boss Of Me

The honking baritone sax from “Dirty Boys” reappears in bathetic-ironic mode to underscore the plight of a hapless lad stuck on the spike of feminism: Who’d have ever dreamed,” he marvels plaintively, “that a smalltown girl like you would be the boss of me?”


Dancing Out In Space

David Torn’s interweaving guitar whines lend a miasmic, psychedelic flavour to the prancing, Motown-style funk-rock groove of one of the album’s hookiest, catchiest trifles, a celebration of dance: “No one here can beat you/Dancing out in space.” An obvious future single.


How Does The Grass Grow?

A phrase apparently used to assist in bayonet practice – “How does the grass grow? Blood, blood, blood!” – is given an absurdist makeover by the addition of the hook motif from The Shadows’ “Apache”, sung as a falsetto “yah-yah-yah-yah”. Weird doesn’t quite cover it.


(You Will) Set The World On Fire

A terse guitar riff in the style of early Kinks carries this song about ambition and fame, sung as if by a manager flattering his client: “I can hear the nation cry!” Period references set it firmly in the Sixties, notably the claim that “Kennedy would kill for the lines that she’s written/Van Ronk says to Bobby, ‘She’s the next real thing!’” Another obvious potential single.


You Feel So Lonely You Could Die

As the album cruises to its close, the tone becomes more melancholy with this melodramatic, epic evocation of someone’s loneliness and suicidal depression. “I can see you as a corpse, hanging from a beam... Oh, see if I care, Oh please make it soon,” sings Bowie with exquisite, beautiful poise. “Oblivion shall own you, death alone shall love you.”


Heat

The album closes with the Scott Walkeresque vocal portents and apocalyptic tone and imagery of “Heat”, in which acoustic guitar, strings and guitar noise track the protagonist’s search for his own identity through intimations of guilt and shame, finally resolving into a duality that might stand as the motto for the album as a whole: “I am a seer, but I am a liar.” Which of course, is equivalent to saying “I am a storyteller.”

'The Next Day' is set for release on 11 March in standard and deluxe versions

The Independent


Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 130
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Mer 27 Fév - 13:58 (2013)    Sujet du message: edito les inrocks.fr Répondre en citant

En couverture cette semaine de notre spécial mode semestriel : David Bowie. Nul mieux que lui n’a célébré les noces du rock et de la mode. Très tôt, il a même confié à un professionnel en la matière, le jeune créateur japonais Kansai Yamamoto, le soin de confectionner l’allure de son avatar de légende, Ziggy Stardust. Justaucorps multicolore en tricot, kimonos à géométrie variable, pantalons vases et voilà Ziggy habillé pour la postérité. En retour, le monde de la mode n’a cessé de renvoyer à Bowie l’ascenseur, multipliant au fil des ans les hommages à ses années glam – Kate Moss l’hiver dernier faisait même la couve de Vogue grimée en Ziggy.
La mode a choisi Bowie pour icône rock de son siècle. Pourtant, le rock ne l’avait pas attendu pour fétichiser les vêtements. Ainsi, de ses premiers costumes noirs/cravates fi nes à ses plus tardives combis blanches avec pierreries incrustées (sans parler des lunettes à verres colorés), Elvis Presley avait déja fait de la parure vestimentaire l’attribut majeur d’une rock-star, cette catégorie toute neuve de musiciens dont il inventait les contours.
Avec Bowie pourtant, le vêtement accomplit un saut. Il n’est plus simplement une parure, aussi sophistiquée soit-elle, mais engage une certaine idée de l’être. Avec Bowie, l’identité devient une garde-robe. Le genre est une affaire de costume. La sexualité aussi. On en change aussi facilement que de chemise glitter. L’identité artistique aussi d’ailleurs. À chaque style musical son style vestimentaire, ou l’inverse. Et à chaque style vestimentaire une nouvelle incarnation, qui naît et qui meurt, Ziggy, Aladdin Sane ou The Thin White Duke. Quelque chose s’est joué autour de Bowie dans la sensibilité critique commune.
Avec lui s’est imposée dans la culture populaire l’idée que le talent ne consistait pas à trouver son style, mais plutôt à pouvoir en changer, le jeter au profit d’un autre après l’avoir trouvé. Après Bowie, certaines stars de la pop (Madonna, de manière exemplaire, et jusqu’à Lady Gaga qui, sans se gêner, s’est revendiquée de lui) ont donné une déclinaison toute mercantile à cette proposition de transformation permanente : toujours se réinventer mais pour rester en phase avec le marché, anticiper la demande de masse.
L’impératif de la transformation de soi chez Bowie excède la stratégie marchande et la question à courte vue de précéder ou de suivre la mode. Il ouvre sur une dimension existentielle très forte et universelle : le rapport de chacun avec le temps. Qu’est-ce qu’on fait avec/contre le temps quand on est un humain, c’est la question nodale de l’oeuvre de Bowie. Peut-on aller plus vite que le temps, en ne se fixant sur rien, en se transformant avant que le temps vous transforme ? L’immortalité est-elle un horizon ou un leurre (Les Prédateurs) ? N’y a-t-il d’autres avancées que celle qui mène des cendres aux cendres (Ashes to Ashes) ? Where Are We Now?, demande dans un souffle d’agonie le dernier single, comme si l’auteur n’en revenait pas d’être encore là si tard, mais dans un monde qu’on ne reconnaît plus.
Le temps est au travail chez Bowie et l’amusante série anglaise Life on Mars l’a bien compris. Un agent de police est renversé en 2006 par une voiture. La chanson qu’il écoute est Life on Mars de Bowie. À son réveil, il entend la même chanson à la radio mais il a été téléporté en 1973. David Bowie invite à voyager dans le temps. Toute son oeuvre (pas seulement ses chansons, mais aussi la façon dont il se présente, dont il a vécu, ce dandysme dont il a été l’incarnation la plus absolue dans le rock) ne cesse d’interroger et de vouloir en découdre avec cette pauvre petite chose qu’est le temps humain. En 1971, dans Changes, il écrivait: “Time may change me, but I can’t change time.” Le temps peut me changer, mais je ne peux pas remonter le temps. Bien sûr qu’il le peut et c’est pour ça qu’on l’aime.
Jean-Marc Lalanne


source http://www.lesinrocks.com/2013/02/27/actualite/ledito-de-jean-marc-lalanne-…


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 13:31 (2013)    Sujet du message: Rolling Stone Mexico mars 2013 Répondre en citant

------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:11 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 130
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 14:00 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

que guay y exotico el rolling stone mexicano !  Okay  

Revenir en haut
cm


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 130
Localisation: Barcelona

MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 14:04 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

Tambien esta en el Rolling Stone Chile ! David Bowie's return !


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 14:14 (2013)    Sujet du message: Studio Bruxelles Répondre en citant

-------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:27 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 14:32 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:28 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Mister_Ed


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 21 Aoû 2011
Messages: 138
Localisation: Bruxelles

MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 16:14 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

Ha haaaa !


Je vais me connecter à Stubru, alors... Excellente radio flamande à Bruxelles, d'ailleurs !!!


Merci !
_________________
It's happening now, not tomorrow !


Revenir en haut
Nathanad


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 30 Mai 2011
Messages: 26

MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 16:50 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

Je ne sais pas pourquoi mais je sens qu'avant la fin du week-end on aura écouté l'album au moins en pré-écoute.....

Revenir en haut
Pearldiver


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 30 Déc 2012
Messages: 129

MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 18:53 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

Je trouve les 2 articles très bien.
Une critique d'album plutôt bonne, et je suis un peu d'accord avec eux: étant toujours à l'affut des nouveaux groupes intéressants, on aurait pu s'attendre à ce que bowie s'entoure de nouveaux collaborateurs
mais ils sont plutôt positifs sur l'album et au moins eux précisent que la critique n'est basée que sur une seule écoute.
On peut supposer qu'en décortiquant davantage l'album, leur avis ne pourra en être que meilleur


Revenir en haut
Pearldiver


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 30 Déc 2012
Messages: 129

MessagePosté le: Jeu 28 Fév - 18:56 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

ah oui et je sais pas si ç'a déjà été indiqué quelque part ici, mais ils sortent en mars un hors série spécial bowie
(et dans le mag aussi un tite pub eurostar / David is )


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Sam 2 Mar - 11:13 (2013)    Sujet du message: Guitare sèche le mag Mars/Avril 2013 Répondre en citant

-------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:10 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Sam 2 Mar - 23:30 (2013)    Sujet du message: The London Magazine Répondre en citant

-------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 17:11 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
halloweenduke


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 15 Déc 2011
Messages: 457
Localisation: Paris 75013

MessagePosté le: Dim 3 Mar - 11:21 (2013)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse Répondre en citant

Shocked  Oui c est quoi çe lien?
_________________
**Years pass so swiftly**


Revenir en haut
Contenu Sponsorisé






MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 14:48 (2016)    Sujet du message: Bowie 2013 - revue de presse

Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 1 Heure
Aller à la page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  >
Page 1 sur 5

 
Sauter vers:  

Index | Panneau d’administration | creer un forum gratuit | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com