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J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
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MessagePosté le: Ven 11 Nov - 20:22 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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lunamagic
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MessagePosté le: Ven 11 Nov - 21:31 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



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MessagePosté le: Ven 11 Nov - 22:34 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant




Master shape-shifter invulnerable to the decline of pop music
By Peter Aspden

The news that David Bowie was on the brink of leaving EMI, reported this week by the FT, marked the souring of a relationship between two of the behemoths of British popular culture. The troubled music group, which is now set to be split and sold to Vivendi’s Universal Music and Sony, could ill-afford to lose one of its most lustrous money-earners. For the past 15 years it has held the rights to one of pop music’s most prestigious back catalogues, comprising such classic albums as Ziggy Stardust and Let’s Dance.

As for Bowie, well, his literally glittering career has taught us to expect the unexpected. “Changes” was the name of one of his most charming songs, but it was also a life strategy. After the extraordinary social changes of the 1960s, it was Bowie who dominated the following decade with an intoxicating blend of flamboyance, fine art and consummate media manipulation.

His legacy has proved lasting. His mastery of shape-shifting and restless reinvention – a term he hates – cast the template for modern pop stardom. There would have been no Madonna, no Lady Gaga, without Bowie. No one made fame look more appealing, more glamorous.

Bowie dislikes the emphasis given to his identity games because he believes there has always been an intellectual coherence to his work. In 1969’s Space Oddity, as the world celebrated the first lunar landing, Bowie struck a melancholy note: “Planet earth is blue, and there’s nothing I can do”. A decade later, Major Tom’s lonely angst was still in Bowie’s mind. But in 1980’s “Ashes to Ashes”, he had become an alienated junkie, “strung out in heaven’s high, hitting an all-time low”.

In the intervening years, Bowie had experimented with a bewildering number of musical and fashion styles, from plastic soul boy to Mitteleuropean intellectual. But there was no mistaking the arc of gradual disillusionment discernible in those classic albums of the 1970s, more potent than any stricture issued by the International Monetary Fund.

Despite commercial success in the 1980s, nothing produced by Bowie since those febrile times has matched the quality of his early work. But he continued to mirror, if not forge ahead of, the times, and emerged as a shrewd business operator.

He formed his own management company and was one of the first pop stars to appreciate that playing live concerts could be as lucrative as selling records and CDs. A series of world tours were rapturously received and helped make him one of the world’s wealthiest musicians.

But it was in 1997, as he turned 50, that one of his business moves showed the same kind of radical turn that had made his early music so alluring. Bowie struck a licensing deal with EMI for his back catalogue giving the group the rights to release 25 albums from 1969 to 1990, and was guaranteed more than 25 per cent of the royalties from wholesale sales in the US.

Bowie used the deal as collateral for investors who bought his 10-year “Bowie bonds” in a move arranged by the banker David Pullman, using future royalties as securitisation. The bonds were sold for $55m, and the deal became the talk of the industry.

Analysts foresaw a sharp growth in so-called “celebrity bonds”, and Pullman went on to make similar deals for James Brown, the Isley Brothers and Marvin Gaye.

But times were ch-ch-changing faster than Bowie could imagine. By the turn of the millennium, CD sales were in sharp decline as internet distribution of music established itself. Suddenly those royalties looked less secure, and by 2004 Moody’s had downgraded Bowie bonds to one notch above junk. For once, Bowie’s timing was awry. These were the days when peer-to-peer services such as Napster looked set to blow a hole in intellectual property and copyright legislation, causing record companies and artists alike to fear for their future.

The companies fought back, finding ever more elaborate ways of repackaging old goods to make them appealing to affluent and nostalgic baby boomers. Just last year, Bowie’s Station to Station album from 1976 was released in a deluxe box set edition for £80 – with memorabilia, essays, exclusive mixes and even vinyl. Bowie’s golden years were being squeezed for every last penny.

But there comes a time when every piece of tatty tinsel from pop’s halcyon days has been unearthed, recycled and flogged off. As Amazon and Apple devise new pricing structures, and services such as Spotify forge new business models, the traditional music industry remains ever more embattled.

The success of Bowie bonds had also inspired Guy Hands, a master of securitising assets from pubs to motorway service stations, to believe he could do the same with EMI’s back catalogue. But he was caught out by the collapse of the credit markets, never managing to spread the risk of 2007’s £4.2bn takeover.

In many ways the arc of Bowie’s career mirrors what has happened to pop music itself: from uncertain beginnings in the 1960s, reaching its pomp in the 1970s, and exploiting its success through clever business deals in the 1980s and 1990s. But has something got lost on the way?

The clamour over Steve Jobs’ death shows the extent to which pop music is a fading force, compared with the beautiful machines that convey it to the masses.

But Bowie remains gloriously invulnerable to the demise of the art form he graced with such aplomb. He has proved his artistic mettle several times over, and settled into heritage status, nursing himself back to health after a heart attack, and making the odd cameo appearance on such cultural landmarks as SpongeBob SquarePants. He hasn’t made an album since 2003’s Reality.

His reasons for disenchantment with EMI are not clear, but we shouldn’t be surprised if he has another radical change of direction up his sleeve. No British cultural figure has so enjoyed confounding expectations, nor earned the right to go his own way.

Peter Aspden is the FT’s arts writer. Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson also contributed to this profile

Financial Times


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MessagePosté le: Sam 12 Nov - 09:34 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

lunamagic a écrit:


Bowie Fripp Eno dans le même Bateau... Espérons qu'ils le mettent vite à l'eau avant que les idées ne se diluent ...

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lunamagic
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MessagePosté le: Sam 12 Nov - 10:16 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Angie performing in London in 2010 Angie and David Bowie in 1975


The Irish Times - Saturday, November 12, 2011
Then & Now: Angie Bowie

Kevin Courtney

JOHN HAD YOKO, Mick had Bianca, and David Bowie had Angela Barnett, a flame-haired siren who inspired Bowie to develop his Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane and Thin White Duke personae. David and Angie were English rock’s quirky royal couple, looking and dressing alike in bright red mullets and silk kimonos, and shocking the music world with tales of drugs, cross-dressing, threesomes and bisexual trysts.

Bowie and Barnett met in London in 1969, through a mutual acquaintance, or, as Bowie put it, “because we were both going out with the same man”. Angie’s arrival encouraged Bowie to explore his androgynous side, but not everyone in Bowie’s entourage took to this loud, domineering American. The couple moved into Haddon Hall, a grand Victorian house in Beckenham, Kent, and established themselves as London’s king and queen of tarts, presiding over a heady social scene and living an “open” marriage. Bowie wrote The Prettiest Star for Angie, and the couple were married in 1970, Angie giving birth to a son a year later. They named him Zowie. Today, Zowie is better known as film-maker Duncan Jones, director of the recent sci-fi blockbuster Source Code.

She was born Mary Angela Barnett in Cyprus in 1949, the daughter of an ex-US army colonel. She had a privileged upbringing, attending a posh girls’ school in Montreux, Switzerland from the age of nine, and then going to the US at 16 to attend Connecticut College for Women. When she moved to England to attend Kingston Polytechnic, she found her milieu among the arty, avant-garde set in swinging London. She introduced Bowie to many of the strange, eccentric types who would provide the blueprints for his future alter-egos. She’s been credited with helping to start the glam-rock movement.

As Bowie’s career took off, however, Angie and Zowie were pushed into the background as Bowie moved onwards towards superstardom. They separated in 1976, and divorced in 1980, after which, says Angie, Bowie tried to “edit” her out of his life. “Famous men frequently do that when they feel threatened by a woman’s influence,” she said. “They like to be thought of as the sole genius. God forbid that any woman helped them to get where they did. Picasso did the same thing to his women – he tried to write them off as insane.”

After the divorce, Bowie got custody of Zowie, and Angie became estranged from her only son. Recently, Duncan Jones told the London Times that he had no plans to reconnect with his mother. “I haven’t heard from Zowie, or Duncan as he calls himself now, for five years,” Angie told the Guardian in 2010. “He emailed me, but the relationship didn’t progress and I think reconciliation is unlikely.”

After divorcing Bowie, she had a daughter, Stacia, with punk musician Drew Blood, and now lives in Tucson, Arizona with her current partner. She published her memoir, Backstage Passes: Life on the Wild Side with David Bowie, in 1993. She set up Aidsbegone to raise funds for research into a vaccine for the HIV virus, releasing two compilation albums and performing fundraising concerts of her own.

She also recorded her own album, Moon Goddess, in 2002, which features a song called For The Sake of Fame: “There’s a time and a heart for this/Let my soul never miss/A beat on this glorious stage of life.” She may have influenced Bowie’s image, but definitely not his lyrics.

The Irish Times


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vladimir
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MessagePosté le: Dim 13 Nov - 09:03 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

cm a écrit:

lunamagic a écrit:





Bowie Fripp Eno dans le même Bateau... Espérons qu'ils le mettent vite à l'eau avant que les idées ne se diluent ...

Je vois que Luna a les mêmes lectures que moi...Pas mal ce site de Robert Fripp...
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lunamagic
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MessagePosté le: Jeu 17 Nov - 11:29 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant




Blast Off: 1969’s Space Oddity Launches David Bowie
Ted Drozdowski|11.17.2011

David Bowie’s career was not exactly skyrocketing in early 1969. He’d already been through several bands that failed to make a dent in the British charts or the London clubs, and his 1967 debut album David Bowie was a risky pop effort that missed the mark. The song “Rubber Band,” for example, used a tuba as lead instrument, and electric guitar was entirely absent – just as Eric Clapton and Cream and Jimi Hendrix were riding to superstardom on the cutting edge of six-string rock, and The Who’s Pete Townshend was cranking his amps to 11. To make matters worse, Bowie’s greatest recognition to date was via the commercial he made for the Lyons Maid ice cream brand, later countered by a rejection from the makers of Kit Kat candy bars.

Nonetheless, his prowess as a hit songwriter for other artists, including Billy Fury and the single-named Oscar, gave Bowie’s handlers hope. And when his second full-length disc Space Oddity – initially also titled David Bowie in Europe – was released on November 4, 1969, those hopes were validated. The album’s title track was a major hit, and the disc’s eclectic character foreshadowed many of the places he’d take his music during the chameleonic first decade of his career, as well as his knack for tapping into trends for his compositions.

“Space Oddity” quickly became a staple of FM radio, which was then at the creative height of its programming. Much speculation has been devoted to the song’s origin. It’s been rumored to have been inspired by Pink Floyd’s “Astronomy Domine” and by Stanley Kubrick’s ground-breaking 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey as well as the U.S. Apollo lunar landing program. More likely, it was the latter, which allowed the Earthbound to listen to plenty of the conversation between the astronauts and “ground control.”


The song was a work of high art that incorporated the exploratory sonics of the times and reached #5 on the U.K. pop charts. Bowie played Stylophone – a miniature stylus-operated synthesizer – on the track and a pre-Yes Rick Wakeman performed on both Mellotron and piano. Mick Wayne played the tune’s signature electric lead guitar lines, since Gibson Les Paul Custom legend Mick Ronson wouldn’t join Bowie’s group to become the first of his long line of fully realized guitar foils until February 5 of the next year.


Wayne made several other killer contributions to the Space Oddity album. He played a ripping track on “Unwashed and Somewhat Slightly Dazed” in counterpoint to Bowie’s Dylanesque vocal-and-harmonica performance. In fact, “Space Oddity” was the album’s oddity as well. The expansive sound was in contrast to the trendy folk-rock that dominated the disc in tunes like “Letter to Hermione,” an ode to Bowie’s ex-girlfriend, and “An Occasional Dream.” However, Bowie’s outsider perspective was already in place. “God Knows I’m Good” was written from the point of view of a shoplifter. And “Cygnet Committee” tells the story of a leader whose efforts to elevate his followers provide them with the means to turn on him. It was Bowie’s take on what he saw as the false brotherhood of the hippie culture.


It took nearly three more years for “Space Oddity” to make its mark on the American pop charts, when the album was reissued in the States in 1972. New performances were added to the U.S. version of the LP, which became notable for Bowie’s first recording with Ronson – the Buddhist-grounded late addition “Wild Eyed Boy From Freecloud,” which also featured a 50-member orchestra.

Ronson’s debut in Bowie’s band – then called the Hype – was a live broadcast on famed British DJ John Peel’s BBC Radio 1 show. When they played on stage at the Roundhouse on February 22 they dressed in superhero costumes, and outlandish costuming would be an important part of Bowie’s oeuvre through 1974’s Diamond Dogs, with a dip back for 1980’s edgy Scary Monsters tour and videos.

Ronson’s muscular riffs would become the cornerstone of the first albums made by what was initially billed as “Bowie’s electric band,” and he and Bowie handled most of the arrangements for The Man Who Sold the World, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, Hunky Dory, Alladin Sane and Pin Ups. During that period Ronson also helped Bowie produce and arrange All the Young Dudes for Mott the Hoople and Lou Reed’s Transformer, playing piano on “Perfect Day.”

Bowie has had a string of guitar foils following Ronson who served similar duty as sonic mad scientists or musical anchors. The key players include Earl Slick (Diamond Dogs, Station to Station), Carlos Alamar (Young Americans, Station To Station, Low), Robert Fripp (“Heroes”, Scary Monsters), Adrian Belew (Lodger), Stevie Ray Vaughan (Let’s Dance), Peter Frampton (Never Let Me Down) and Reeves Gabrels (Tin Machine, Outside, Earthling). Bowie and Ronson also reunited for one track, a cover of Cream’s “I Feel Free,” on 1993’s Black Tie White Noise shortly before his death by cancer at age 46.



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MessagePosté le: Lun 21 Nov - 08:45 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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Dernière édition par cm le Dim 1 Sep - 08:26 (2013); édité 1 fois
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MessagePosté le: Lun 21 Nov - 18:30 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

David Bowie and the Montreux Jazz Festival

11.11.2011








Montreux Jazz "For the Record" - Discover some stories or anecdotes of the Festival since its beginning in 1967.


The rock icon, David Bowie has a special attachment with Montreux. Having lived in the area for some time, he recorded between 1977 and 1993 some of his hits at Mountain Studios, owned at that time by the rock band Queen, with whom he also collaborated on the E.P. Under Pressure.

Long time friend with the Montreux Jazz Festival founder Claude Nobs, David Bowie made a noteworthy contribution to the Festival: He is the designer of the 1995 official poster of the Festival (official posters) but we especially remember him in 2002, when invited to perform at the Auditorium Stravinski, he gave one of the most impressive performances of the entire Montreux Jazz Festival history.
During 3 hours, he offered an amazing show going through 30 of his classics (concerts database). A legendary performance that will stay in the mind of the lucky attenders who where in Montreux that night!

Watch the pictures from his concert in 2002







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MessagePosté le: Lun 21 Nov - 19:15 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

M-A-G-N-I-F-I-Q-U-E Okay
Que de bons souvenirs et Bowie était si classe!
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MessagePosté le: Lun 21 Nov - 19:42 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Heu ... tu y étais ? 

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LadyRonson
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MessagePosté le: Lun 21 Nov - 19:54 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Non malheureusement, Ghanima lui y était le chanceux.Les bons souvenirs viennent de cette année 2002 où j'avais vu Bowie à L'Olympia,au Zénith, à Virgin et à canal +...
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MessagePosté le: Lun 21 Nov - 20:16 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Alors, c'est en 2002 que tu as "rencontré" Bowie ?   (ou que tu as reçu un autographe ...  je ne sais plus ...)    Il y avait une photo de Bowie & toi dans l'ancien manof ...  Rolling Eyes

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MessagePosté le: Mar 22 Nov - 15:18 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

RedSails a écrit:
Alors, c'est en 2002 que tu as "rencontré" Bowie ?   (ou que tu as reçu un autographe ...  je ne sais plus ...)    Il y avait une photo de Bowie & toi dans l'ancien manof ...  Rolling Eyes

Hi,

Oui j'avais raconté un peu l'histoire de ces quelques mois "fous" (2002)
Bowie était en tournée évidement et en promo.Il signait des autographes au virgin mégastore.Nous avons attendu pas mal d'heures avant de pouvoir le rencontrer.
Je suis passée dans les 10 premières et la seule chose que j'ai pu lui dire est "Est- il vraiment l'heure de boire un café?" en montrant sa mug en plastique Cool
Avec mon anglais pourri et le vacarme,il m'a fait répéter, puis il a esquissé un sourire ( j'imagine qu'il  se disait :" ma petite avec ce que je me suis mis dans la tête dans les années 70, c'est pas un café à 18H00 qui va m'empêcher de dormir!!!)
Il m'a tout de même signé deux autographes au lieu d'un et j'ai eu le droit à une poignée de main ( j'ai pas osé lui demander un bise...)

La seconde fois ( le lendemain ) il passait à Canal + pour une émission avec Beigbeder.Je m'étais habillée pareille ( un haut bien rouge avec un gros bijou), les deux amis qui m'accompagnaient également avaient exprès gardé les mêmes vêtements ( oui faut être con). Rolling Eyes
A un moment donné de la pause. Bowie a tourné (comme un gosse) sur son tabouret haut et regardé le public( scindé en deux) une partie derrière lui et l'autre ,dont je faisais partie, à sa gauche.Il faisait des "coucou", il a regardé fixement quelques personnes et sourit.Il a ensuite dit à Beigbeder "C'est marrant je reconnais des gens que j'ai vu hier!".
En réalité tout les fans ( les gens qui était aussi venu pour Virgin) l'ont pris pour eux.Chacun est reparti avec l'idée que Bowie l'avait reconnu lui et lui seul...

Bowie a chanté "Every one says hi" et une autre chanson, "Cactus" peut être.
Je me rappelle aussi que pendant la pause, il a parlé à Coco j'ai cru entendre : "j'étais bien?", car après elle a fait "oui" de la tête et lui apporté quelque chose à boire.
Il est passé juste devant moi lorsqu'il est entré, je l'ai trouvé tout fluet bien que j'étais assise, mais "super bien proportionné" ( c'est ce dont je me rappelle avoir dit à mes amis).

Donc pour finir Red, non je n'ai pas de photo avec Bowie proprement dite.Par contre sur la vidéo existante de virgin, on me voit clairement devant lui, avec quelques autres momiens d'ailleurs.


voilllaaaa Razz
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MessagePosté le: Mar 22 Nov - 15:22 (2011)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


Bowie au Virgin 2002.
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