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J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
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MessagePosté le: Jeu 24 Juil - 15:27 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



Photo: Eduard Meyer's private collection


The sound behind the vision

by Dominic Mealy on July 21, 2014

Former Hansa Studios recording engineer Eduard Meyer recalls his time with Bowie and Iggy.

When a journalist came to interview me at the time of Bowie’s 60th birthday, his first question was “So, did David Bowie sleep with Romy Haag?”

“Ask him yourself,” was my answer. “I was not in the room.”

That was not at all the kind of relationship that I had with David Bowie. I began my career at Hansa Studios on February 15, 1976. David made his first appearance at the studio that very winter and let me be clear, when he arrived I had no idea who he was. My background lies in classical music. I had some knowledge of krautrock, but in general I had no interest in pop music. He was not coming from the stars, we did not roll out a red carpet for him... he was simply a client of our studio.

Nevertheless, we became friendly. I had a good deal of experience with musicians and producers who simply had no idea about how music should sound and how it should be recorded. This was completely different with David Bowie and Tony Visconti. It was clear from day one that they knew exactly how to make the music they wanted. They had it in their veins.

I began work on Low as a translator, simply because I was the best English-speaking engineer at the studio. I worked as an intermediary, translating for David during the sessions and for Tony Visconti during the mixing. Naturally, we spent some time together. Hansa looked out onto the Wall; the border guard could see right into the studio and even hear the music. Once, I made a little joke – I took one of the studio lamps and shone it directly at the guard tower. David and Tony jumped under the table [laughs] but they would never have shot at us.

It was on one of those evenings that that photo was taken with the three of us sitting in the control room, David on the left, Tony in the middle and me on the right. We were just sharing a joke at the end of the day when Coco [Schwab, Bowie’s assistant] snapped that photo.

I was also invited to a Christmas meal at David and Iggy’s apartment on Hauptstraße – Coco roasted a bird, it was very nice. Of course I heard that David and Iggy and the others went for some big nights out around Berlin, but in general I didn’t meet them outside of the studio. I had my own private life at home with my family.

When David started “Heroes”, I was less involved because the crew were more or less able to deal with it themselves. But I would still come by the studio once a day and see what was going on. The next time I worked with David was on Iggy Pop’s Lust for Life album, which David produced, then on the Bertolt Brecht EP Baal [1982].

It was a great atmosphere. David and Iggy were always very well behaved, I never saw any drugs or anything like that, but they would always have a case of beer to quench their thirst. They had fun though. One time at Feierabend, three very beautiful young women came to the control room. David greeted them and told them to wait before saying to Iggy, “Pick the one you want. I’ll take the other two.” [Laughs]

David returned to Berlin to play a concert in front of the Reichstag in 1987, but during that week he also booked a day-long session at Hansa. We had security at all the doors; we took it very seriously and worked our asses off to get everything ready. Suddenly the band started playing “Time Will Crawl”. We couldn’t understand what was going on – the song had already been released! I went to David and told him that we had to prepare a microphone for him, but he just laughed saying, “No, not for this session.”

It was right at that moment that that photograph was taken, with David smiling with his cigarette and me in a state of confusion. It turned out that David’s crew had a trade union contract that required that they must be employed at least once a week. He had just booked the studio to keep them busy. It ended up being a lot of fun and I still have the 24-track to this day.

Since David Bowie, many famous international bands and musicians have used Hansa and many people have asked me about the times I spent with David. But back in 1977 I had absolutely no idea. It was simply part of my job. Perhaps I should have kept a diary!

As told to Dominic Mealy.



Eduard Meyer

Born ‘Edu’ in 1943, Meyer studied recording engineering and music at the Robert Schumann Konservatorium in Düsseldorf. After a stint recording “mainly Schlager” at Cornet Studios in Cologne, he worked at Berlin’s iconic Hansa Studios from 1976-2003, working with such musical luminaries as Can, Tangerine Dream and, of course, David Bowie. Also an accomplished cellist, Meyer played on the Low track “Art Decade”. He’s currently enjoying his retirement in rural North Rhine-Westphalia.

Originally published in issue #127, May 2014.

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MessagePosté le: Sam 26 Juil - 10:04 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Why we're still batty for superstar David Bowie
Ireland's top singers are paying tribute to the Starman

David Bowie is a pop star like no other - a rocker, a fabulist, an icon for the ages. As Ziggy Stardust, he romped in an leopardskin catsuit. In his Thin White Duke guise, he was skinny and pale, a vision of slicked hair and gleaming formal wear. In the video to 'Ashes to Ashes', he was one of the scariest clowns to grace our TV screens.

Uncovering the 'real' David Bowie has always been a challenge. Musically and sartorially, the singer, now 67, has flitted through many incarnations, rarely pausing long enough for audiences to catch up. Through the 1970s, especially, each season seemed to bring a new Bowie. It was almost as if he was teasing us with his abilities to switch identity.

This weekend, Irish Bowie fans have a unique opportunity to sample most of these incarnations at once (apart, you sincerely hope, from the horribly flapping Bowie of the Live Aid 'Dancing In Street' video). Tomorrow, the National Concert Hall's Art Of The Song event will see artists such as Lisa Hannigan, Duke Special, Heathers, Adrian Crowley and Jape's Richie Egan join in an evening of tribute to the chameleon of contemporary rock.

"Bowie kept me going through school," says Adrian Crowley, a cult songwriter whose hushed balladry couldn't be further removed from Bowie's sci-fi pomp.

"I found his different guises fascinating. Do I have a favourite Bowie phase? I love them all really."

Eyes widening, Crowley reveals he was lucky enough to see Bowie up close once, at a secret show at what is today the The Academy in Dublin. He'll never forget it.

"It was an invite-only gig in 1999 and, naturally, I wasn't invited. A friend of mine had tickets. She saw the look on my face after I heard she was going and felt compelled to give me the second ticket. Up close he was incredible. His smile… his eyes were like a beacon as he walked out on stage. I was up on my chair clapping. I thought, 'I'm making a fool of myself'. Then I realised everyone else was doing the same."

Even as a fledgling songwriter, Crowley struggled to comprehend Bowie's sheer inventiveness. 'Changes', 'Starman', 'Jean Genie'… these songs sounded as if they had winked into existence. It was difficult to imagine someone sitting at a piano, or with a guitar on their lap, bashing them out for the first time. Actually it was impossible.

"I saw his music as these strange, otherworldly creations, coming through the speaker," Crowley recalls. "I couldn't understand how they could be done. There was an incredible richness."

One of the remarkable things about Bowie is that, while his music is outwardly complex, the songs themselves are surprisingly straightforward, says Richie Egan of Jape, a winner 
of the Choice Music Prize for best Irish album.

"The instruments are so out there. And yet, if you break them down they are usually quite simple. His genius was to write straightforwardly, then turn it crazy. You hear it first and you think, 'how the hell did he do that?' Then you sit down with it and it's relatively straightforward. So it's a good education."

Amid the swooning, however, it would be remiss not to acknowledge that, as with every performer, Bowie has had his bumps along the way. As already mentioned, 1985's 'Dancing In the Street' was surely a low point - prancing and preening in his ridiculous white trench coat, Bowie managed to make Jagger look like the classier dancer (not even the fact that the single was a charity release made it excusable). For the next 10 years, his cool evaporated; he became merely another slick pop star, not so different from Phil Collins or Elton John.

"In a career like the one he's had, inevitably certain phases will be popular, others less so. But I've never guffawed at him," says Crowley. "In my teens, I tried to get out of listening to him obsessively because I was discovering new music. Ultimately, he never disappointed me."

Recently, Bowie has tried on a new identity for size: that of pop's answer to Howard Hughes. Living below the radar in New York with wife Iman and 14-year-old daughter Lexi, he is somewhat of a recluse, rarely seen in public and never performing live. His comeback album from last year The Next Day (his first new output in nearly a decade) was recorded in complete secrecy - with help from Dublin guitarist Gerry Leonard - and, several bizarre videos aside, Bowie has done little to promote it. His influence on popular culture has never felt as pervasive and yet is completely invisible.

"I was a bit worried to find out he was coming back," says Crowley. "I wasn't sure what it was going to be like. My fear was he would emerge from the silence and do something maybe he shouldn't have. But, you know, it is a gorgeous album: very sad, very honest."

Bowie fans will wonder what songs they can expect to hear at the National Concert Hall. Perhaps taking a leaf from the singer's latter-day philosophy of giving away as little as possible, the performers are declining to provide details. All they can confirm is that the set will blend familiar tracks and more obscure numbers (if any Bowie composition can truly be described in those terms).

"It is going to be a surprise for whoever shows up," says Crowley. "What I will say is that it's rare for me to sing someone else's material. To do that I have to love it. I would not do it unless I had a deep empathy."

Asked to surmise Bowie's influence on popular culture, the usually voluble Richie Egan is at a loss.

"He's an example of how to grow old as a musician and a person in a really classy manner. It's weird talking about David Bowie isn't it? It's like talking about the wind. He's just there."

'David Bowie: The Art Of The Song' is at National Concert Hall Dublin Saturday from 8pm, nch.ie

Irish Independent


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MessagePosté le: Sam 26 Juil - 11:49 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





25 Jul, 2014

Classic Max’s: David Bowie meets Bruce Springsteen in 1972

When he wasn’t performing, David Bowie would frequent the Back Room to get inspiration. Here’s what he had to say about the first time he saw Bruce Springsteen:

“So this guy is sitting up there with an acoustic guitar doing a complete Dylan thing. My friend and I were about to leave when he started introducing a band who were joining him on stage.”

He continued; “The moment they kicked in he was another performer. All the Dylanesque stuff dropped off him and he rocked. I became a major fan that night and picked up Asbury Park immediately.”

Inspired by Bruce Springsteen’s performance, David Bowie recorded a batch of Springsteen covers when he returned to London.Two years later, the pair would come together in a recording studio in Philadelphia for David Bowie’s cover of the Bruce Springsteen classic “Saint In The City”.

When asked what other American artists Bowie wanted to cover he answered; “There are none.”

Watch the early Bruce Springsteen video from Classic Max’s that influenced David Bowie.

Max's Kansas City


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MessagePosté le: Mar 29 Juil - 11:02 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Lost & Found: David Bowie Dances on Soul Train
By Chris Ford

David Bowie dancing on ‘Soul Train’ is a thing of beauty. He couldn’t look more British if he tried. Bowie lip-synced his hit song ‘Fame’ on ‘Soul Train,’ but the snarly angst still comes through. He’d just been through some bad times with his management, and the song is a bit of a response to those bad times.

Bowie wrote ‘Fame’ with John Lennon after they had a long discussion about the problems that come with being a celebrity. Bowie called up his band, and they all recorded ‘Fame’ — as well as a cover of the Beatles‘ ‘Across the Universe’ — at the famous Electric Lady Studios. Both tracks ended up on Bowie’s 1975 album ‘Young Americans.’

The man once known as Ziggy Stardust answered a few questions from the audience before performing. One guy seemed to catch Bowie off-guard by asking if he was appearing alongside Elizabeth Taylor in an upcoming film. Bowie was probably surprised by the total randomness of the question.





Bowie dances through another one of his soul songs, ‘Golden Years,’ during this performance. He initially offered ‘Golden Years’ to Elvis Presley — but the King passed on it. So Bowie recorded it himself, and it wrapped up his soul/funk era. Soon after that, he recorded his legendary Berlin Trilogy — ‘Low,’ ‘Heroes’ and ‘Lodger.’ Check out his performance of ‘Golden Years’ in the video below.

diffuser.fm





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MessagePosté le: Mar 29 Juil - 17:20 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Dartford-bound Paul Nicholas recalls working with Beckenham's David Bowie pre-fame

By Jim Palmer, leisure editor
Updated 10:23am Tuesday 29th July 2014


Paul Nicholas is perhaps best known for his BAFTA-nominated lead role in the 80s sitcom Just Good Friends, but a fledgling pop career in the 1960s brought him into contact with a pre-fame David Bowie.

In the early 1960s, Paul – now 68 – was trying to make it as a pop star under the name Oscar when he recorded the novelty song Over The Wall, written by a young man from Beckenham.

Paul - who is set to direct, produce and act in Blockbuster the Musical, which premieres at The Orchard Theatre in Dartford on September 11 – said: “When I was about 19, I was trying to have a hit record and I met this guy called David Jones.

“He was a songwriter. At that time there were a lot of jailbreaks going on and it was a national joke that all these prisoners kept escaping.

“He had written as song called Over the Wall We Go, All Coppers and Nanas.

“I recorded it and it got banned by the BBC.

“It wasn’t a hit but you can see it on Youtube.

“He came to the session and he’s actually on the record. He does a bit of talking in the middle of it.

“He was quite intense, I remember. He was quite into mime, and I think he is quite a good mime artist. He wasn’t well known then.

“Of course, he went on to have a fantastic career so his intenseness obviously paid off, while I was laughing and having a fag.”





Although the song wasn’t a hit, Paul did go on to have three top 20 hits in the mid 1970s.

More successful still was his stage career. Alongside Elaine Paige, he was the first part of the first British couple to play the lead roles in Grease; he was the original Rum Tum Tugger in Cats and the first Jesus in Jesus Christ Superstar in the West End in 1972.

A familiar face from TV, Paul starred Just Good Friends, Bust and Close to Home in the 1980s and has been a fixture on TV screens since.

He has also produced a number of big nationwide touring plays, including Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.

His latest show, Blockbuster the Musical, features the songs of the 70s and 80s songwriting duo Chinn and Chapman.

Paul is directing, producing and playing the part of record shop owner Crazy Max.

He said: “It is interesting because it all stops with you. If it all goes wrong, I just look in the mirror and say ‘it’s your fault’.”

Blockbuster the Musical is at The Orchard Theatre from September 11 to 20. Go to orchardtheatre.com or call 01322 220000.

News Shopper


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MessagePosté le: Mer 30 Juil - 09:31 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


Amanda Lear : "Les fausses informations alimentent le mystère"

mercredi 30 juillet 2014

Mannequin dans les années 60, Amanda Lear est ensuite apparue dans de nombreuses émissions télé et a fait du théâtre. Sa troisième pièce, Divina, parle des mésaventures d'une ex-star de la télé, qui ne veut pas disparaitre, et qui accepte une émission de cuisine pourrie, sur une chaîne TNT.

Ses amours

Amanda Lear a été l'égérie de Salvador Dali pendant 15 ans, mais ils n'ont jamais été amants. "Ce n'était pas vraiment mon type d'homme, à l'époque j'étais plus attiré par les guitariste que par les vieux messieurs bedonnants. Mais, il y avait quelque chose de fascinant qui faisait que l'on était amoureuse de Salvador Dali."

Elle a été la maitresse de David Bowie. Alors que Marianne Faithfull se trouvait chez lui, elle appela Amanda Lear pour lui dire que Bowie était fou d'elle depuis qu'il avait vu ses photos. Il lui envoya son chauffeur à 2h du matin, et ce qui devait arriver arriva. Le lendemain, la femme de David Bowie appelle.

"Elle m'a téléphoné en me disant "bonjour, je suis Madame Bowie, est-ce que je pourrais parler à mon mari". A l'époque, je croyais qu'il était célibataire, mais j'ai eu de très bon rapport avec sa femme, nous allions faire du shopping ensemble et nous nous partagions son mari."

La rumeur

Il y a une rumeur qui court sur elle depuis les années 70, quand elle chantait Follow Me et que ça passait dans toutes les boites, rumeur lancée par Dali et propagée par Bowie : elle serait un homme, voire un transsexuel. Elle a même posé nue dans Playboy en 79 pour faire mine de démentir, mais ne l'a jamais vraiment fait.

"Cela m'a fait de la pub d'enfer. Je ne faisais pas de la très bonne musique, soyons clair, et j'avais besoin de publicité. Tous les journaux et les télévisions ont parlé de moi."

Une rumeur relayée sur Wikipédia, comme ailleurs. "Sur Wikipédia cela m'arrange beaucoup parce qu'il y a 10.000 infos entièrement fausses et toutes se contredisent. C'est très bien pour alimenter le mystère. Plus on alimente et plus on parle de moi et ce qui alimente le succès c'est la provoc."

France Info



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MessagePosté le: Mer 30 Juil - 09:38 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


Croatian film festival bosses pull movie from competition over music copyright

Organisers behind Croatia's Pula Film Festival were forced to pull a picture out of competition on Saturday (26Jul14) after discovering moviemakers had breached copyright laws by using songs by DAVID BOWIE and THE DOORS without permission.

Published: Mon, July 28, 2014

Vlog, directed by Bruno Pavid and produced by Slobodan Jokic of Croatia's Split Film Academy, featured tracks including Bowie's Space Oddity, The Doors' Light My Fire and Janis Joplin's Cry Baby for dramatic effect during one sequence, but after officials noticed there were no music rights included in the credits, they learned the tunes had been used illegally.

Festival bosses then decided to drop the film from competition.

Producer and festival boardmember Mike Downey says, "We cannot condone copyright infringement by any film in our competition."

Jury members announced the winners of the 61st annual event later that evening, with Kristijan Milic's war movie Number 55 leading the way with eight awards, including Best Film, Best Director and Best Script for Ivan Pavlicic, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Express.co.uk



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MessagePosté le: Mer 30 Juil - 10:14 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

"Il y a une rumeur qui court sur elle depuis les années 70, quand elle chantait Follow Me et que ça passait dans toutes les boites, rumeur lancée par Dali et propagée par Bowie : elle serait un homme, voire un transsexuel"
Je me souviens bien de cette rumeur. A l'époque, ma grand-mère en était convaincue... Smile
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MessagePosté le: Jeu 31 Juil - 10:03 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





The cartoon caveman who inspired David Bowie

By Erik Adams Jul 30, 2014 •1:00 PM





In Hear This, A.V. Club writers sing the praises of songs they know well—some inspired by a weekly theme and some not, but always songs worth hearing. This week, we’re picking our favorite comics-related songs.


“Look at those cavemen go.” Swirling masses populate David Bowie’s “Life On Mars?”—a silver-screen junkie, the leader of either the Russian revolution or the biggest band in the world, and a certain cartoon mouse—so some Neanderthals were bound to sneak past the guards. But like that “Lennon’s on sale again” (or is it “Lenin’s on sale again”?) line, there’s more to Bowie’s fighting sailors than meets the eye. “Life On Mars?” is a pop-art canvas, and the cavemen are lifted from the prehistoric panels of V.T. Hamlin—more specifically, a 1960 musical tribute to Hamlin’s fuzzy-faced hero, made famous by an act that was as much of a put-on as Ziggy Stardust.


The gap bridging The Hollywood Argyles’ “Alley Oop” and “Life On Mars?” is Kim Fowley, the recording-studio fixture and future Runaways Svengali who guided Bowie through one of his first trips to Los Angeles. An incorrigible hype man, Fowley essentially ginned up his first chart success, building a fake band around roommate Gary S. Paxton in order to record a country tune about a cartoon caveman. The Argyles were as fictional as the subject of their sole No. 1 hit, but that doesn’t diminish any of the swinging snarl Fowley and Paxton brought to “Alley Oop.” Their take on the song isn’t the most accurate representation of Hamlin’s creation, but it has the properly primitive sound for the character, one that was also suited to the snot-nosed upstarts attempting to replicate Fowley and Paxton’s success in the nation’s garages, rec halls, and high-school auditoriums. Bowie would outpace them all, but not before showing a debt of gratitude within one of his most iconic tracks.

The A.V. Club





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MessagePosté le: Lun 4 Aoû - 14:30 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

http://www.newsshopper.co.uk/news/11385545.Bromley_s_David_Bowie_donates_to…Bromley's David Bowie donates to Beckenham bandstand he once played on at first ever 'Free Festival'
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MessagePosté le: Mar 5 Aoû - 19:19 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant




Becoming David Bowie

David Bowie: Becoming David Bowie movie is scheduled to be released Sep 09, 2014 by the Pride studio. This 2DVD set tells the complete story of the making of David Bowie. David Bowie: Becoming David Bowie movie From his first recordings made under his real name of David Jones up to the release of his enormously influential breakthrough record Ziggy Stardust and The Spiders From Mars, the entire build-up to Bowie's enormous success is dissected over the course of a 90 minute documentary and a selection of filmed interviews with David.


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MessagePosté le: Mer 6 Aoû - 11:13 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Time May Change Me: David Bowie and Omikron: The Nomad Soul


By Joe Bernardi
August 5, 2014 | 10:00am


Every time I thought I’d got it made / It seemed the taste / was not so sweet—David Bowie, “Changes,” Hunky Dory, 1971

We’ll all be right, we’ll all be right / We’ll all be right in the now—David Bowie, “We All Go Through,” Omikron: The Nomad Soul Soundtrack, 1999

A redheaded guy with a too-spherical face and extremely widely-set eyes jumps through a pixelated hurricane of a portal and immediately starts in with a fast-paced, confusing speech about transferring my soul into his body in order to enter his dimension and perform some urgent mission. After what seems like an intentionally vague cut-scene featuring both a monster and a bipedal robot, I am knocked several feet by one of countless identical hovercars, losing about eighty percent of my health.

So began my attempt to revisit Omikron, a half-written symphony of a virtual city and a nearly impressive failure of a videogame.

One of Omikron’s most touted features was the inclusion of three styles of play: third-person adventuring, head-to-head fighting and first-person shooting. Each is broken in its own elegant, low-level way. Omikron’s most significant in-game text, including municipal signs, is set in a typeface that is part stereotypical Egyptian script, part Mr. Saturn from Earthbound, and nearly unreadable. The city’s curiously plentiful bikini-clad asses are rendered angular and unconvincing, even by the standards of the day. Omikron’s status as a police state is the crux of the game’s first act, but the security at the city’s police headquarters can be entirely circumvented using a drugged cup of coffee and a pornographic magazine.

All of the above points were lost on me in 2002, during my first tour of Omikron. I was stuck whiling away summer vacation at my parents’ house, and my copy of Omikron was less a collection of bugs and half-baked ideas and more a decent-sized well of things to do that weren’t eating snacks, trying (with moderate success) to fool myself into liking the era’s lunk-headed brand of straight edge hardcore, or talking to internet friends. In fact, I enjoyed the game so much that I bestowed upon it the greatest honor available to me at the time: A couple of weeks later I rented it a second time in order to finish it. Almost exactly 12 years later, it appeared on a GOG sale and effortlessly coaxed a nostalgia-coated tenner out of my imaginary digital wallet.





Omikron’s largest enduring legacy is the involvement of David Bowie. Bowie lent his voice to two in-game characters, wrote a few of the songs on Hours specifically for the soundtrack, and supposedly had some input on story and design. Whether he had a direct influence or not, Omikron leans heavily on the half-formed, paranoid “David Bowie future stuff” vibes that fly quite successfully in an unhinged film like The Man Who Fell To Earth, but which fall to earth (or whatever planet this is) extremely quickly in a videogame that demands a more fleshed-out universe.

Another way Omikron was influenced by Bowie: It permits the player to switch bodies nearly at will. As one progresses through the game, they’re apt to find themselves behind the eyes of a surprisingly wide variety of thieves, tough guys and squares. In 2002, I was a year away from moving to college and finally grabbing some of the freedom that had been eluding me as a carless, suburban internet teen. I played as the original weird-looking cop for as long as you possibly could, until the game executed him and my soul was forced to inhabit someone else. My sticking with the cop makes sense in retrospect: From an identity standpoint 16 year-old me was pretty content with band t-shirts, Dreamcast games and blue Gatorade. My fear made sense: Lack of change creates fear of change. When it came, would it be like one of David Bowie’s, coming off as simultaneously effortless and revelatory? Or would it be more like one of Omikron’s genre changes, where everything would suddenly cease to work as expected and become absurdly, unfairly difficult?

In 2014 I inhabited as many Omikronians as I could in hopes of making the game more fun, which did not work. I live in New York now, and it’s arguable that the only defensible reason for me to try to cram myself here was an inclination towards the sense of potential and variety of human experience that this place offers. Nobody has any job security. People are always arriving or leaving. Change is a constant, which is another way of saying that it’s easy to cop out of committing to very much.





David Bowie’s ability to suss depth out of that kind of transience—his fluctuating personalities and wholehearted, sincere embrace of boogaloo dudes, queen bitches and rock and roll’s most frivolous traits—played a huge part in setting him apart from his peers, who mostly seemed concerned with acting like they were carved from marble and making grand gestures towards history. Bowie’s ability to pivot on a dime was, among other things, the result of the new social and cultural freedoms afforded by the post-hippie era in which he came up, but his bold-faced commitment made him The Thin White Duke instead of Skinny Coke Haircut Dork.

Omikron: The Nomad Soul’s transience (a generous way of saying the game spreads itself too thin) was, among other things, the result of technological freedoms afforded by increases in storage space and processing speed. For whatever input Bowie had in the game, however, he was unable to contribute his trademark monomania. Instead of doing one thing really well and changing that thing extremely frequently, Omikron just does a lot of different things poorly. Whether you’re a musical genius, a fourth-tier videogame or some boogaloo dude in New York, maintaining a good balance of structure and churn is hard, but it pays off.

Aside from (reluctantly) fond memories of playing it until sunrise, I’m unable to rouse the source of the goodwill I ever had for Omikron. Like my love of blue Gatorade, or a time when you could con maybe the coolest person of all time into contributing to your terrible but well-intentioned videogame, or the Let’s Dance era when Bowie had a blonde perm and wore suspenders all the time, that part of me is probably gone for good. After guiding an Omikronian poetry student to death by hail of gunfire for the eighth or ninth time in a row, I pulled the chute and impulsively went out drinking with a friend I’ve had for years and a friend I just met a few weeks ago. We took a chance on a bar we don’t go to very often; the music sucked but they were playing The Warriors, so it was fine.

Joe Bernardi is a writer and web developer living in Brooklyn. His words have appeared in Dusted Magazine, the Boston Phoenix and Tiny Mix Tapes, among other places. He’s got both a Twitter and a blog.

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MessagePosté le: Ven 8 Aoû - 17:23 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

J'ai acheté à l'époque ce jeu pour la participation de Bowie, de mémoire il y avait la possibilité , dans un bar, d'écouter quelques titres live avec DB et musiciens ...
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MessagePosté le: Sam 9 Aoû - 11:20 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

idem , je l'ai tjrs
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MessagePosté le: Lun 11 Aoû - 18:47 (2014)    Sujet du message: 15 Surprising Artists Without a No. 1 Album Répondre en citant





15 Surprising Artists Without a No. 1 Album
By Keith Caulfield | August 11, 2014 10:55 AM EDT

What do David Bowie, Marvin Gaye and Kiss have in common? They've all failed to crack the top spot on the Billboard 200.

In light of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ achievement of earning its first No. 1 album on the Billboard 200 -- after a nearly 37-year wait -- what other acts are still without a chart-topper? Check out this list of the veteran artists who are still waiting to top Billboard's albums chart:

David Bowie: The rock legend recently tallied his highest-charting album ever with 2013’s surprise release The Next Day. It’s one of his seven top 10 albums, and four to reach the top five. He also got close to the top with the No. 3-peaking Station to Station in 1976 and the No. 4 Let’s Dance in 1983. The latter set contains the smash title track, which is one of his two No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 singles...

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