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J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
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lunamagic
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MessagePosté le: Mer 20 Aoû - 13:30 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





See David Bowie, at 17, Defending Long-Haired Men on TV

Young David Jones was tired of people asking if they can hold his purse

WRITTEN BY Colin Joyce

August 11 2014, 4:19 PM ET

Before David Bowie was a rock'n'roll chameleon, he was David "Davey" Jones, a poor teen simply fighting for the right to wear his hair down to his shoulders. In an old interview from BBC's Tonight, recently unearthed by Open Culture, proto-Ziggy makes an appearance with some similarly long-haired friends to speak out against the poor treatment they've received because of their locks.

"I think we're all fairly tolerant," Bowie says in what's apparently his first-ever television interview. "But for the last two years we've had comments like 'Darling!' and 'Can I carry your handbag?' thrown at us, and I think it just has to stop now."

For this reason Bowie and friends apparently chose to band together as the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Long-Haired Men.

"I think we all like long hair," he says "And we don't see why other people should persecute us because of this."

It all seems a little tongue-in-cheek, of course, and the man did have a reputation for playing with the press and public expectations, so don't count on this being an entirely serious "society" even with their stated plans to "march and protest." Then again, there is a Facebook page for the "political organization." You can watch the whole interview above as you wait for more music from the famous recluse.

SPIN



Harry Styles And Ashton Irwin Seriously Owe David Bowie — Here’s Why

They remind me of this babe...

by Brenna Ehrlich 8/12/2014

David Bowie may be a musical pioneer — sure, that’s all well and good. But did you know he also made it possible for the likes of Harry Styles and Ashton Irwin to look the way they do? Yup, you could say that lads like them are the hairs to Bowie’s throne…

Apparently, when Bowie was a teen way back in the black and white days, he and a group of similarly-locked boys formed the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Long-Haired Men and even went on BBC’s “Tonight” to take a stand against shears.

Naturally, it’s all a little tongue-in-cheeck, but it certainly is fun to hear 17-year-old Aladdin Sane utter the words, “The last two years we’ve had comments like ‘Darling!’ and ‘Can I carry your handbag?’ thrown at us, and I think it just has to stop now.”

Bowie’s hair doesn’t look all that unkempt when compared to the ‘dos topping the heads of today’s boy bands — it’s actually pretty tame — which is why we think his reluctance to be hair-shamed paved the way for today’s boy bands.

Harry, Ashton — you can send your “thanks yous” to the future, where Bowie resides from now until the world crashes into the sun.

MTV


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MessagePosté le: Mer 20 Aoû - 19:19 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Brighton Dome Heritage: Sitting in the Stalls - you’re sitting in the Stables!

20 Aug 2014

A brief history of Brighton Dome Concert Hall

Next time you're visiting Brighton’s famous 'Dome' (now our Concert Hall) to see a show try to arrive early. Take your seat in the Stalls; and take a moment to listen carefully and we’re not talking about listing for music here… Make yourself comfortable, relax and you might just hear the clip-clop of ghostly hooves; it’s Escape, one of the Prince Regent’s horses!

...And into the 20th and 21st century we’ve played host to a number of celebrated performers. 1973 saw David Bowie appear on our stage with tickets at £1.20

Brighton Dome





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MessagePosté le: Ven 22 Aoû - 20:14 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


AUGUST 19, 2014
BY SOMETHING ELSE!

‘I was like, what is this?’: Opening for David Bowie was memorable for Hall and Oates – sort of

As Daryl Hall and John Oates worked their way to stardom, there followed the inevitable opening gigs — and the just-as-inevitable opening-gig highlight reel of hilarity. For instance, they once got into a tussle with Ginger Baker (“I guess he didn’t like us,” Oates says), and then there was smoking backstage with Cheech and Chong.

Best of all, though, was playing as a support act for David Bowie’s first American shows, as Oates tells Pat Monahan. This was in 1972, long before Hall and Oates’ ’80s-era breakthrough — heck, even prior to their initial rock experiments with 1974′s War Babies.

“We were in our folk mode,” Oates confirms, “and we didn’t know what he was doing. I had known his previous album (1971's Hunky Dory), which was a little, kind of folky. And when I saw him backstage, with the shaved eyebrows and the orange hair and the giant platform shoes, I was like, ‘What is this?’”

Things only got weirder later on. “I had made the mistake of taking a Quaaluude,” Oates adds, laughing. “So, I went out in the audience, and I sat down to watch his show. The show started with the theme from 2001 and these strobe lights — and then they came out, as the Spiders from Mars. I had never seen anything like that in my life. It was a totally life-changing experience.”

Understandable. Asked, however, if it was a positive one, Oates can only say: “I think it was; I can’t remember!”

Something Else!


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MessagePosté le: Ven 22 Aoû - 20:24 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





David Bowie recording of “Let’s Dance” start to finish in 17 Days

"Believe it or not, it took 17 days from start to mix done. On the 18th day, there was a bunch of people sitting in the recording studio listening to it. We never touched this record again. The album was done in 17 days, mixed, delivered. Stevie Ray Vaughan, Bowie, all those solos, everything done." – Nile Rodgers

Posted on August 18, 2014 by Timothy Hollywood Khan


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MessagePosté le: Lun 25 Aoû - 17:50 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Fame: David Bowie Comic To Explore One Of Music’s Most Unique Stars

by NICK TYLWALK 2h ago

David Bowie has always seemed a little bit like a comic book character come to life. I’m not old enough to remember his Ziggy Stardust days, but I do remember him from Labyrinth, and performances like that plus the way he reinvented himself musically over the years are worthy of a costumed alter ego.

Bluewater Productions recognizes that fact too, which is why it’s making Bowie the next subject in its ongoing Fame series. Fame: David Bowie is available for pre-order now in both digital and physical formats, the latter of which will boast six different collectible covers — some of which we’re showing off below — showing off Bowie’s different looks throughout the years.

Written by Mike Lynch and illustrated by George Amaru, the book explores the way Bowie was able to change his appearance and his sound to stay relevant, influencing music, fashion and more.

“Few artists are able to make the impact on both the worlds of music and acting that David Bowie has,” Amaru said in a statement. “As a longtime fan of his work in both areas, it was an honor and privilege to work on this book.”

Fame: David Bowie can be pre-ordered digitally through iTunes or from Comic Flea Market for print copies.

Bam! Smack! Pow!









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MessagePosté le: Mar 26 Aoû - 19:42 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant







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MessagePosté le: Mar 26 Aoû - 21:09 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Et un article d'annonce dans la presse, aussi...
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/503613/Kate-Bush-David-Bowie-Before-the-Da…
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MessagePosté le: Mer 27 Aoû - 08:55 (2014)    Sujet du message: Flashback: David Bowie Sings 'Changes' at His Last Public Performance Répondre en citant





Flashback: David Bowie Sings 'Changes' at His Last Public Performance

The Thin White Duke hasn't sang a note onstage since this 2006 New York charity gig

BY ANDY GREENE | August 26, 2014

David Bowie's three-song set at New York's Hammerstein Ballroom didn't draw a lot of attention back in November 2006. He played as part of Keep a Child Alive's annual Black Ball fundraiser, along with Alicia Keys, Damian Marley and comedian Wanda Sykes, breaking out "Wild Is the Wind," "Fantastic Voyage" and "Changes," which he sang as a duet with Keys. Nobody had even the faintest idea it would be his last public performance before his grand disappearing act.

Bowie's never explained why he hasn't sang a note onstage in the last eight years, though many fans point to the heart attack that abruptly ended his 2003-'04 Reality tour. That was certainly a major scare, but that didn't stop him from playing with Arcade Fire twice in 2005 and David Gilmour the following year. He even announced a comeback gig in 2007 as part of New York's High Line festival, but it was cancelled a few months later without explanation.

He re-emerged in early 2013 with The Next Day, his first new LP in a decade, but he didn't promote it with a single live performance or even an interview. He did appear in videos to support the album (looking as dapper as ever), but he's since fallen off the grid again, popping up only in the occasional paparazzi photo with his wife Iman and their teenage daughter.

Anything could happen in the future, but it's quite possible this performance of "Changes" could mark the end of his performing career. The 1971 song was one of his earliest hits, and the 24-year-old Bowie was clearly feeling a little boastful at the time. "Look out all you rock & rollers," he wrote. "Pretty soon you're going to get older."

He was 59 when he sang it again at the Black Ball, not an age when many of his peers are even thinking about retirement. Fans continue to pray there will be one more tour or even a single performance somewhere, but as the years go by that's beginning to seem less and less likely.

RollingStone


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MessagePosté le: Mer 27 Aoû - 08:57 (2014)    Sujet du message: David Bowie and Quantum Mechanics Répondre en citant



Brian Cox


David Bowie and Quantum Mechanics

A British physicist and TV personality ponders the meaning of Bowie's 'Life on Mars?'

Aug. 26, 2014 11:25 a.m. ET

Brian Cox, 46, is professor of physics at the University of Manchester in England and host of BBC programs on science. He spoke with Marc Myers.

As a physicist, I spend a lot of time looking at the sky and wondering how the universe works. David Bowie's "Life on Mars?" first captured my imagination when I heard it on his 1971 album, "Hunky Dory." The song approaches magical realism.

"Mars" opens gently with Rick Wakeman's superb piano and Bowie singing, but it soon builds to a symphonic release. I also love the quaint, cinematic images that Bowie unfurls in the lyrics, like "sailors fighting in the dance hall" and "take a look at the lawman beating up the wrong guy." All of this, from the perspective of a "girl with mousy hair" watching a movie that's "a saddening bore." In the chorus, the song asks suddenly, "Is there life on Mars?"—as if the singer is looking upward for a utopian escape from life's "freakiest show."



David Bowie Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images


"Mars" was released a couple of years after the Apollo 11 moon landing in '69, when there was already talk about landing a probe on Mars. Space was the future then. Today, we think more about how small our next cellphone is going to be. There's something about that period and those kinds of wondrous ideas about space that still intrigues me.

One interpretation of the line "Is there life on Mars?" is that it's merely a pop-culture cliché, a shortcut to a different question. But when I listen to the song, I hear someone dreaming about the possibilities of space and I'm elated.

The great thing about many of Bowie's songs is that you can read a lot into them, superimposing your own ideas on top, which I think was deliberate on his part. In this regard, "Mars" is like a wave function in quantum mechanics. A wave function is an ensemble of possibilities, but only one is realized when you look at it. I think good pop music works the same way. It's too brief a form to construct an idea, like a film or a symphony, and its meaning constantly changes depending on the imagination of the listener. The genius of "Mars" is that it's able to trigger that kind of restless thinking and imagery.

The Wall Street Journal




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MessagePosté le: Ven 29 Aoû - 00:10 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





10 Essential Berlin Albums
by Adam Blyweiss, A.T. Bossenger, Jordan J. Michael, Paul Pearson, Sam Prickett and Jeff Terich
August 28, 2014 · in Feature, Treble's Top 10



Lou ReedBerlin
(1973; RCA)
Buy at iTunes

Before Sid and Nancy there were Jim and Caroline, Lou Reed’s fictional-yet-believably-doomed lovers and the subject of his 1973 rock opera Berlin. Reed’s follow up to Transformer was recorded in London and New York but, as the title suggests, Berlin serves as the main setting for the events that conspire. And those events are heavy; collectively, the couple suffers from addiction, commits infidelity, gets their children taken away and commit suicide. And through it all, Reed crafts a sparse, haunting image of the streets of Berlin, more akin to that of Gotham City in the grittiest, most surreal of Batman comics.

Berlin belongs to an odd set of albums; those released — by an established artist — to a mostly negative response, but eventually lauded in the eyes of critics and fans alike. It’s a dismal and minimalist affair, but it shows Reed’s songwriting ability at its strongest. After all, few other singer-songwriters could push through the gambit of emotions on a song like “The Kids” with the relatively quiet and gentle approach Reed takes. – ATB



David Bowie“Heroes”
(1977; RCA)
Buy at iTunes

It’s stupefying to think of David Bowie’s late-seventies output in today’s terms: starting with 1976’s Station to Station, he put out five of rock’s all-time greatest albums in as many years. Blame it on the cocaine, maybe, or his fruitful partnership with Brian Eno, which saw the two holing up in Berlin’s Hansa Studio by the Wall to record what has since been termed “the Berlin Trilogy,” consisting of 1977’s Low and “Heroes,” and 1979’s Lodger. Ask three people and they each might pick a different favorite, but “Heroes” is certainly the trilogy’s most iconic record. There’s a polished rawness to its sound; amidst production that is somehow simultaneously cacophonous and immediately catchy, Bowie sounds like he’s beaming in from an underground bomb shelter. There’s the title track, a still-relevant teen anthem; the ambient experimentalism of “Sense of Doubt” and “Moss Garden;” the drawling comedy of “The Secret Life of Arabia;” and, perhaps the album’s most rewarding track, the post-apocalyptic doo-wop, “Sons of the Silent Age.” “Heroes” comes from the most fruitful era of Bowie’s almost half-century of a career, and the fact that it seems to have hardly aged only reinforces its iconic status. – SP


Iggy PopThe Idiot
(1977; Virgin)
Buy at Insound (vinyl)

Iggy Pop and David Bowie must have had some sleepless nights in Berlin. After going almost completely insane — at times cutting himself on stage while drugged up on who knows what — with The Stooges, Pop checked into rehab and disappeared from the music scene for a while. After checking out, he joined forces with Bowie for the production of The Idiot, Pop’s first solo effort, and what he has called his “album of freedom.” From the opening moments of “Sister Midnight,” Pop is already a more subdued man. He’s sing-speaking instead of yelling like a banshee, and the music behind him is more Bowie than The Stooges. With Bowie on keyboards, synth, guitar, piano, saxophone, and xylophone, and Bowie’s guitarist, Carlos Alomar, playing on The Idiot, some critics believe that Pop was deliberately co-opted by Bowie. Nevertheless, there must have been something special about the Hansa Tonstudio in Berlin: Bowie and Pop each released two albums in 1977 — Low and Heroes, and The Idiot and Lust For Life, respectively — that were recorded at the locale often referred to as “Hansa Studio By the Wall.” The Idiot may be unrepresentative of Pop’s other music, but the art-rock and proto-punk genius of this album was an influence for someone like Joy Division’s Ian Curtis; the record has the dubious distinction of being found spinning on his turntable when he was found after hanging himself. Sure, some of The Idiot is bleak — check Pop’s lyric sheet or the siphoned siren sounds of “Mass Production” — but when the snappy piano swagger of “Nightclubbing” plays, it’s time to hit those ghostly streets. – JJM...

Treblezine


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MessagePosté le: Ven 29 Aoû - 10:18 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





Top 10 David Bowie Songs
hosted by Rebecca Brayton

Top 10 David Bowie Songs Script written by Craig Butler. He helped put the “glam” in glam rock, but this rock ‘n’ roll chameleon is a lot more than just outrageous make-up and glittery clothes. And his songs prove it. For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 David Bowie songs. Special thanks to our users Marie Scraeyen, estronal, superwolf234, Sara Anne, Marie Scraeyen, David NM and Paeanoa Kingi for submitting the idea on our Suggest Page at WatchMojo.com/suggest


VIDEO SCRIPT

Script written by Craig Butler.

He helped put the “glam” in glam rock, but this rock ‘n’ roll chameleon is a lot more than just outrageous make-up and glittery clothes. And his songs prove it. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 David Bowie songs.

For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs.

#10: “Golden Years”
“Golden Years” single (1975)

“Golden Years” was Bowie’s second single to crack the Top 10 in the United States and continued the “plastic soul” sound he had initiated with his previous single, the massive hit “Fame.” Bowie claims he wrote the song for Elvis Presley; and while it’s intriguing to think what “The King” might have done with it, its unique funk sound is 100% Bowie.

#9: “Suffragette City”
The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972)

Bowie’s 1972 album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars was a watershed for him – and many consider it his finest record. It’s filled with incredible songs, including the propulsively catchy “Suffragette City.” One of Bowie’s most rocking songs, it moves like a bat out of hell from first note to last and manages to pay tribute to Little Richard along the way.

#8: “Young Americans”
Young Americans (1975)

“Young Americans” was the first Bowie cut that really showcased his ability to take classic Philly soul sounds and meld them into one that was utterly his own. With a big assist from David Sanborn’s tasty sax, backing vocal arrangements by Luther Vandross and a semi-samba beat, the song’s musical groove provides a tasty counterbalance to the lyrics’ cynical references to America in the 1970s.

#7: “Heroes”
Heroes (1977)

Heroes was the second Bowie album created in collaboration with minimalist Brian Eno, and the title track is one of the singer’s masterpieces. It didn’t achieve massive commercial success, peaking at #24 in the U.K. and not even charting on the Hot 100 in the States; but it’s a true critic’s darling. There are notable moments throughout, including some awesome Robert Fripp guitar work, but it’s the cohesiveness of all the elements that really impresses.

#6: “Life on Mars?”
Hunky Dory (1971)

Although the lyrics suggest some sort of surreal dreamscape, Bowie’s “Life on Mars?” is an acidic yet oddly sensitive take on youthful confusion, circa 1971. Confronted with overwhelming images from a world they must inhabit but didn’t make, who wouldn’t wonder about alternatives to this reality? Add in a pounding piano, an otherworldly string section and a nakedly yearning vocal performance and the result is irresistible – and a top 3 hit in the UK.

#5: “Changes”
Hunky Dory (1971)

“Changes” is an especially apt song for Bowie, considered one of rock’s most chameleonic artists for his ability to change both personas and musical styles with ease. Although the song earned only moderate chart success, it has become one of Bowie’s most identifiable tracks – and why not? That stuttering chorus, simple yet surprising bridge and catchy bass and sax figures, combined with Bowie’s playful vocal, make this a song one is always welcome to stumble across.

#4: “Fame”
Young Americans (1975)

“Fame” was something of an afterthought, making it onto the Young Americans album at the last minute. It became Bowie’s first #1 single in the United States and went gold to boot. Created with John Lennon and featuring a memorable guitar riff from Carlos Alomar, it’s a nasty, bitter diatribe about – what else? – fame. But the funky rhythm and echoing wail of the music make the message totally palatable – and dance-able.

#3: “Rebel Rebel”
Diamond Dogs (1974)

One of Bowie’s finest glam rock outings, “Rebel Rebel” has a guitar riff to die for and an attitude that’s more Rolling Stones than the Stones themselves. Yet it somehow comes across as playful, even with lyrics like “Hot tramp, I love you so.” Bowie moved beyond glam rock after this cut, but it’s a fitting tribute to the genre – and a demonstration of its power in the right hands.

#2: “Ziggy Stardust”
The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972)

Guitarist Mick Ronson shines on “Ziggy Stardust,” but Bowie’s vocal matches him. Snarling one minute, winning the next, Bowie sails through this story of an extraordinary rock figure and the dangers of stardom. It’s an oft-told tale, but Bowie gives it strange details and wild musical passages that make it seem fresh. As with most great performers, it’s not what Bowie says really; it’s the way that he says it.

Before we reveal our top pick, here are a few honorable mentions:
- “Modern Love”
Let’s Dance (1983)
- “Let’s Dance”
Let’s Dance (1983)
- “The Jean Genie”
Aladdin Sane (1973)
- “I’m Afraid of Americans”
Earthling (1997)
- “The Stars (Are Out Tonight)”
The Next Day (2013)

#1: “Space Oddity”
“Space Oddity” single (1969)

Bowie’s first hit was a mindblower: “Space Oddity,” the tale of Major Tom, a make-believe astronaut stuck in space. When released in 1969, it was timely: both “2001: A Space Odyssey” and the Apollo 11 moon landing were big news. But “Space Oddity” has lived on, always a favorite because of its beautifully crafted structure, captivating yet odd story and strangely appealing musical themes - and Bowie’s vocal is one of his most compelling – which is saying something.

Do you agree with our choices? What other outstanding David Bowie songs is your favorite? For more enthralling top 10s published daily, be sure to subscribe to WatchMojo.com.

Watch Mojo


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MessagePosté le: Ven 29 Aoû - 21:35 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

À titre perso, et artistiquement parlant... je trouve ça pas mal... Mise à part la présence de Suffragette et de Fame, qui est discutable... Je pense que Ashes To Ashes méritait une place... 
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MessagePosté le: Ven 29 Aoû - 22:13 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

A l'exception notable de "Heroes" et life on mars c'est quasi la tracklist des 11 titres de CHANGESONEBOWIE. la compilation parfaite donc Wink
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MessagePosté le: Ven 29 Aoû - 22:22 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Pour chipoter: Lady Grinning Soul ou Station to Station pour remplacer Rebel Rebel et ce sera parfait.  Smile

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MessagePosté le: Ven 29 Aoû - 22:54 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Bah et Let´s dance alors !!    Laughing
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I wonder why we came.


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