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J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
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MessagePosté le: Sam 30 Aoû - 07:55 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

"For this list, we’ve chosen our entries based on a combination of the artist’s fan favorites and their most commercially successful songs."
Au temps pour moi.  Embarassed


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MessagePosté le: Dim 31 Aoû - 12:38 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





It is on people! Two weeks from tonight, Saturday September 13th starting at 5pm, Dirty Fingers is having an anniversary party. BOWIEFINGER! will be going down at the shop. Fabulous food, delicious beer, new labor rate board artwork unveiling, and most importantly live music from Scary Monster and the Super Creeps a David Bowie tribute experience. Come dressed as your favorite Bowie and help us celebrate not going out of business for another year. Best Bowie gets the prize. See you there.

Dirty Fingers Bicycles


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MessagePosté le: Mar 2 Sep - 19:10 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


The influence of David Bowie on the rom-com Words and Pictures
Posted By Ben Sachs today at 12.30 PM

Like many Chicagoans, I'm eagerly looking forward to the David Bowie exhibit that opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art later this month. I'm also excited about the upcoming Doc Films series (copresented by the MCA) of movies featuring Bowie, which occupies the second Thursday-night slot on Doc's fall calendar. Bowie's records have always exhibited strong affinities with cinema. Many of them center on Bowie playing a different character (Ziggy Stardust, the soulless soul man of Young Americans and Station to Station), and the production often suggests a sonic equivalent to cinematic spectacle, conjuring up specific environments (like the futuristic noir landscape of Outside) or guiding the listener through little narratives.

And of course the cinema has long taken a shine to Bowie. Even in films in which he doesn't appear, Bowie plays a crucial role in establishing mood or invoking a particular cultural legacy. Over the next several months, I'll be writing about various points at which Bowie and cinema intersect, since many of them will screen around town. I'd like to avoid the obvious examples (Man Who Fell to Earth, Labyrinth), at least for a while, since much of the fun of following Bowie's career lies in being surprised by where it goes.

For instance I didn't expect that Bowie would play such an important role in the recent romantic comedy Words and Pictures (one of the year's most underrated films, incidentally). "The Stars (Are Out Tonight)," a standout track from Bowie's The Next Day, plays over a pivotal sequence that reveals new layers of sadness and desperation in Clive Owen's high school English teacher. In this sequence Owen spends a night drinking alone in his house, his behavior growing more reckless as he gets progressively more drunk. The song suits the action brilliantly. For one thing, it really sounds like something a middle-aged, washed-up poet teaching at an elite prep school would listen to. The production, like that of every Bowie record from Hours onward, has an adult-contemporary sheen that makes the music easy on the ears, while the presence of Bowie keeps a certain hipness quotient intact.

"Stars" is much sadder and more bitter than the sonic palette first suggests. A lovely metaphor, the stars in the song represent unshakable memories of people we've known who are now dead. "Their jealousy's spilling down" is a crucial refrain. One extraordinary quality of The Next Day is that Bowie sounds more vulnerable here than he's allowed himself to sound on most of his albums—it's a record about confronting death just before you lose the energy to rail against it. This theme first becomes apparent on "Stars" (the album's third track) somewhere around the halfway mark, when the first traces of anger and regret can be heard in Bowie's performance. It sounds as though the vocals are trying to break free of the song's steady, albeit confining groove.

This effect mirrors the dramatic content of that scene in Words and Pictures. When Owen's character reaches peak inebriation he starts playing racquetball against the outside—and then inside—walls of his house, not caring whether he breaks anything. The reckless action provides an exciting change of pace in this supremely talky film, yet it also introduces Owen's self-destructive streak, which all but gets the better of him in the second half. Come to think of it, there's something Bowie-esque about the movie's unexpected turn from light comedy to domestic tragedy.

Chicago Reader


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MessagePosté le: Mar 9 Sep - 12:54 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



DAVID BOWIE, BRIAN ENO AND TONY VISCONTI RECORD 'WARSZAWA'


Animation by The Brothers McLeod
http://www.brothersmcleod.co.uk/



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MessagePosté le: Mar 9 Sep - 13:16 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





When Iggy Pop and Brian Eno stayed at David Bowie’s place

By Double J 7 Sep 2014

Iggy Pop kicked off his Artist In Residence series with a show, ‘In Praise of Beauty’.

It was a wildly eclectic set of songs that included songs by Nina Simone, Shocking Blue, Sex Pistols, Danish National Radio Symphony and The Doors, to name a few.

Iggy also played a couple of his own songs, 'Down on the Street' from The Stooges' excellent 1970 record Fun House and 'Sixteen' from his 1977 LP Lust For Life, produced by David Bowie.





"That's me singing, I guess you'd call it. I'm kinda shouting. The lyric's fairly self-explanatory, it was about going out and feeling lost and hoping somebody found me. That's a composition of my own."

Iggy said he wrote that particular song at David Bowie's apartment. But one of Bowie's other famous houseguests was not impressed with Iggy Pop's writing style.

"I gotta confess something funny that happened when I did that. I write often by just playing one riff over and over and over for hours and hours, while in my head I imagine the words I could sing or the different parts that might come about.

"I was doing that in David Bowie's apartment while Brian Eno was visiting. It was a little late, he was on the other side of the wall and I was just playing that riff over and over on an electric piano. At one point he pounded on the wall and said 'Stop that mindless noise!'.

"I sympathised with him, he's an awfully nice guy and someone I admire and look up to as a musician. So I stopped."

The song was eventually finished and, importantly, Iggy was pleased with the result.

"But once I got the thing done, I was happy with it," he says. "I was proud of 'Sixteen' and I still get pleasure listening to it."

Listen to Iggy Pop's ‘In Praise of Beauty’ Artist In Residence right here.


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MessagePosté le: Mar 9 Sep - 16:51 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



ROLLING STONE
September 11, 2014







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MessagePosté le: Mer 10 Sep - 21:45 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


The Kinks commemorate 50th anniversary with archival releases, liner notes written by David Bowie

BY CHRIS COPLAN ON SEPTEMBER 10, 2014, 6:28PM

This year marks the 50th anniversary of The Kinks. While founding members Dave and Ray Davies remain undecided on a reunion tour (though odds are trending ever upward), Legacy Records has announced plans to celebrate the iconic band with a series of archival releases.

Due out October 14th, The Essential Kinks is the first-ever career-spanning retrospective anthology for the British rockers. The collection spans 48 tracks over two discs, including classic hits “You Really Got Me”, “Waterloo Sunset”, “Strangers”, “Life Goes On”, and “20th Century Man”, plus live versions of “Lola”, “Till the End of the Day”, and “Where Have All The Good Times Gone”.

Not only did the Davies brothers sign off on the final tracklist, but the set features exclusive liner notes penned by David Bowie himself. Below, read a sample of Bowie’s writing:
    “I’ve never heard a Kinks song that I didn’t like. Of course, from their noisy and brash beginnings, the Kinks have come to stand for some of the most enduring and heart-clutching pop of all time. They are in the gut of every British song-writer who followed them and are indisputably a cornerstone of everything pop and rock. I love ‘em. The world loves ‘em.”
Then, on November 10th, Legacy will release an expanded CD/DVD deluxe edition of 1971’s Muswell Hillbillies. Remastered from analog tapes, the two-disc set features the original album plus nine bonus tracks, seven of which have never before been released in North America. The second disc also includes two rare 1972 television appearances, both of which are also making their North American debut.

To accompany both releases, Legacy has also obtained the licensing for 16 Kings albums released between 1971 and 1986 and have made remastered versions of each LP available for digital download...

Consequence of Sound


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MessagePosté le: Jeu 11 Sep - 09:13 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



LE PARISIEN
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Jeudi 11 septembre 2014







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MessagePosté le: Jeu 11 Sep - 20:46 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


"Warhol, Reed, and Bowie"

Don't want to deal with the mobs at the MCA's big Bowie exhibit? A quieter show featuring the Thin White Duke is happening on the northwest side. In "Warhol, Reed, and Bowie," Jefferson Park's Ed Paschke Art Center is displaying select shots of that trinity of enigmatic pop figures from the massive catalog of Zelig-like photographer Steve Schapiro, a New York native who after a quarter century in Los Angeles moved to Chicago seven years ago.

The consummate fly on the wall, Schapiro always seemed to be in the right place at the right time. Having been a photojournalist for Life magazine in the 60s, he captured Robert Kennedy campaigning in California, Martin Luther King Jr. demonstrating in Selma, Muhammad Ali shadowboxing in his living room, Truman Capote lying in bed. He holed up with Warhol and the Velvet Underground at a dilapidated LA castle during the Exploding Plastic Inevitable tour; several of those shots are featured in the EPAC show.

During the Hollywood renaissance of the late 60s and 70s, Schapiro became a hired gun for studios' promotional arms; he was the set photographer for such classic films as Midnight Cowboy, The Godfather, and Taxi Driver. The candid between-scenes moments he captured would become some of the most iconic images of the last 60 years.

While on the set of Nicolas Roeg's The Man Who Fell to Earth, Schapiro snapped a shot of Bowie smoking a cigarette that Rolling Stone put on the cover of its February 1976 issue; another pic became Bowie's Station to Station album cover. Both of those pieces are on view at the EPAC, as are famous images of Bowie holding a Buster Keaton book from 1975 (the resemblance is uncanny) and another of the rocker leaning over the handlebars of a motorcycle, like some sleazy 70s update of Brando in The Wild One.

"My session with Bowie started at four in the afternoon and ended at four in the morning," the 80-year-old recalls of the '76 shoot that produced the latter photo. "He'd come out of the dressing room in all these incredible outfits, and after a few minutes he'd say, 'I have to go make an adjustment,' and he'd come back wearing something wildly different. He is a true chameleon."  —Jake Malooley

9/13-11/15, Ed Paschke Art Center, 5415 W. Higgins, 312-533-4911, edpaschke.org.

Chicago Reader


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MessagePosté le: Sam 13 Sep - 09:50 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





From the Vault: The legendary David Bowie

September 12, 2014 By: Jeff Royer

It was announced earlier this week that David Bowie will be releasing a new compilation album called Nothing Has Changed on November 18. In addition to capturing five decades of the many faces of Bowie, the 50-year retrospective brings to light a few rarities, re-issues and, most notably, a brand-new track titled “Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)” – an eight-minute epic that will be available on 10″ vinyl (to be released November 28) or as a download – which marks Bowie’s first new recording since 2013′s The Next Day.

In celebration, we’re digging into our own vault to re-issue our exclusive interview with the David Bowie. The interview took place via phone – Bowie called the office from Nice, France – and ran in our December 2003 issue.


“It’s if you can reach 80 and still hold a cup of tea, then you can become a legend,” laughs David Bowie from a hotel phone in France.

While Bowie himself might shrug off the notion, there is little dissension otherwise that, after some 30 years and 26 albums, he is as legendary as legendary gets. From the spacey glitz-rock of Ziggy Stardust to the low crooning of the Thin White Duke, David Bowie’s songs have become part of the defining soundtrack of rock and roll.

But maybe “legend” really is the wrong word. It sounds so final. And any suspicion that there was anything final about Bowie’s career was erased in September with the release of his latest album, Reality, which not only hit No. 1 on the Pan European charts, but debuted in the Top-10 in 15 different countries.

No, says David Bowie, this well is far from dry.





There’s a rattle in Bowie’s voice as we speak. It’s raw, ravaged by a case of laryngitis he first noticed a few days ago during a performance in Nice.

“I had to cut the show short. I only did about an hour and 45, which for me is quite short. And it was still bad last night, so we had to cancel,” he sighs.

“I suppose doing this interview isn’t going to help the situation any,” I offer.

“I can manage this,” he assures. “It’s going for notes that are high – it’s just not there. Three of the band have kind of come down with a flu and cold thing over the last few days. It’s November …”

Bowie is polite and generous during the conversation – and in a remarkably good mood for being sidelined by throat problems just a few weeks into his first large-scale world tour in nearly a decade.


“I think I properly thought I was gonna be dead.
I really didn’t see this as a long-term enterprise at all.
So, it’s a strange thing to still be doing what I do."



There’s a sense of joy about him, something he attributes in part to the blessing of a 3-year-old daughter, in part to the overwhelming reception he and his band have gotten since launching the tour in October. In fact, Bowie’s giddiness doesn’t seem very legend-like at all.

“I try valiantly to not become complacent about any of it,” he explains. “It’s not a career thing for me. It’s really a day-to-day thing, and it really always just settles back on, ‘Am I enjoying what I’m writing? Am I enjoying performing?’”

As the conversation continues, it becomes increasingly apparent that the answer is yes, he’s enjoying his career immensely. At 56, Bowie is still racing full-speed down the hall like a school boy to see what surprises lie around the next bend.

“I’m not sure that I really had an impression of what I’d be doing at this [age],” he insists. “I think I properly thought I was gonna be dead. I really didn’t see this as a long-term enterprise at all. So, it’s a strange thing to still be doing what I do. I think the thing that I’m grateful for is that I still enjoy it as much as I ever did.”

That joy permeates his newest album as well, forming a stark contrast with its predecessor, 2002’s gloomy Heathen. But stark contrast is certainly nothing new to Bowie’s catalog. One minute, he’s an androgynous rock star from outer space. The next, he’s singing Christmas carols with Bing Crosby. He’s practically reinvented himself with each album. Well, maybe not reinvented himself …

“No, no, I hate that expression,” he chuckles. “I suppose [the disparity] is because I don’t particularly have a genre loyalty. I don’t think of myself as an R&B artist, I don’t think of myself as a country and Western artist. I don’t feel like I’m stuck with a genre particularly, so it’s never really bothered me in how I approach the songs.

“The consistency that I have, I think, is that there is a real continuum in the subject matter that I’ve written for 30 years or whatever,” Bowie continues. “I think it’s always pretty much stayed around the same kind of areas, but the way I interpret those things tends to change from album to album.”



Inspired by his adopted hometown of New York, Bowie has been attacking music in the new millennium as ferociously as ever. The rock gems on Reality sound more like the work of an enthused breakthrough artist than a proven veteran – and I mean that in the very best of ways.

“My geographical location has always sort of had a strong bearing on how the work eventually sounds. And I guess hometown these last few years has definitely just been shaking it out of me,” he says, “Since I finished that album I’ve written, hell, I’ve written at least 12 pieces. I just don’t stop writing, really.”

What does stop him from writing, Bowie says, is being on the road. That being said, it looks like his creative flood will be dammed for quite a while by the monstrous “A Reality Tour,” which ultimately will hit at least 17 countries in about seven months. The tour – which lands in the United States on December 6 – has been massively successful throughout Europe.





Although he’s in his fourth decade of rock and roll, Bowie is being praised for displaying a teenager’s vigor on-stage as he plows through hits new and old, from the current single, “New Killer Star” to classics like “Rebel Rebel,” “Changes,” “Fame,” and “Let’s Dance.”
“It’s much more of a sweep chronologically through what I’ve done, and then not always the most expected numbers, either,” he explains. “I’ll pull numbers from Low and Heroes and Lodger as well as do things from Ziggy Stardust and whatever, and I’ll always make sure that there’s a very large input from the last 10 years or so as well.”

With a toddler at home waiting for her daddy, Bowie was not so anxious to return to the road this time around. But the thrill of playing to a sold-out arena of 18,000 in Paris, for example, does help to take the edge off.

“It’s tough out here. It kind of gets lonely,” Bowie admits. “But on the other hand,
I think when the shows are really good – which fortunately so far it’s been really
fantastic – I guess that makes up for it in a small way.”

And more fantastic shows are certainly on the way, says Bowie, just as soon as his voice is back in tip-top condition.

“I think that won’t take long,” Bowie chuckles. “It’s a tough old trooper, my voice. I mean, it’s amazingly rigorous.”

I’m happy to report that the next night’s show went off without a hitch.

Fly Magazine


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MessagePosté le: Lun 15 Sep - 11:18 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



Michael Ochs Archives
David Bowie onstage during his Ziggy Stardust era in 1973.


New biography details David Bowie's versatile sex life and wild orgies with first wife Angie and Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger

In Wendy Leigh's 'Bowie,' glam rocker's many lovers included Elizabeth Taylor, Bianca Jagger, Marianne Faithfull, Susan Sarandon and Ola Hudson, mother of Guns 'N Roses guitarist Slash. Cocaine use amped up his sexual drive as he became 'dedicated to having sex with as many partners as possible.'


BY Sherryl Connelly / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS / Sunday, September 14, 2014, 2:30 AM

Was David Bowie merely a sexual adventurer or an actual sex addict?

“Bowie,” a new biography by Wendy Leigh, invites the question with its close examination of the singer’s astonishing erotic journey over the decades.

Ironically, Bowie has named his soon-to-drop musical compilation from the past 50 years “Nothing Has Changed.” Leigh looks at the same time frame and concludes the exact opposite.

For Bowie, everything has changed, she writes. It seems that only after fully satisfying his voracious sexual appetite was he ready for the life he has now.

From the first, Bowie and his first wife, Angie, “were notorious about weaving a sexual web around those who took their fancy.” Angie, a notorious hedonist who later publicly crashed and burned, aggressively made Bowie her partner in sin from the outset.

Not that he was a naive boy when she met him. Bowie emerged as a teenager from the working-class suburb of Bromley determined to break into London’s music scene where, Leigh writes, he became “adept at playing London’s gay elite.”

As one acquaintance from the time puts it, “I said he would either be a gigantic star or make a lot of money in the Piccadilly men’s loo.”

In fact, Bowie met Angie while they were both having an affair with the same man.

She also worked for the record executive Lou Reizner, boss of Mercury Records, who helped make Bowie a star. Reizner actually loathed the singer, but ultimately signed him for fear that Angie would quit if he didn’t.

The year was 1969, “Space Oddity” was making a splash, and Angie set them up in a decaying, Gothic mansion, Haddon Hall. Bowie lived there as “a pampered prince.” Angie, eager to play the role of an aspiring rock star’s girlfriend, cajoled him from bed daily with a drawn bath, making sure his every need was attended to.



Michael Ochs Archives
David Bowie glammed up in 1973.


She had an “uncanny ability to bring home the most free-spirited girls” willing to make themselves available, not just to him or her, but to both as well as anyone else camping out at Haddon Hall.

After Angie and Bowie married, she gave birth to their son, Zowie, on May 30, 1970. From the first, she felt that becoming a mother made her less appealing to Bowie — as he was developing the Ziggy Stardust persona and other sexual possibilities beckoned.

“I’m gay and always have been,” Bowie flatly told an interviewer at the time.

Was he, really? Or was Bowie cynically setting the stage for the glam/glitter, sexually ambitious Ziggy to emerge? A male lover from the era thinks that Bowie was less gay than lusting for adoration.

“When we were in bed together, he was more sensual and narcissistic,” says Tony Zanetta, Bowie’s assistant. “To him, it was about being adored. . . . I don’t think sex mattered to him.”

Cherry Vanilla, a former Warhol star who worked at Bowie’s Main Man records, says he made love to everyone employed there at least once, men and women.

Certainly on the 17-day tour of the United States that made him an international star in 1972, Bowie sampled freely from groupies of either sex as Angie took up with his Jamaican bodyguard. She was always free for a threesome, though.

Even after they moved into more stately quarters back in London, Angie was frantic to create a “sexual cocoon” that would keep Bowie close. At their home off King’s Road, she placed a 4-foot-deep bed covered in fur in the living room and named it “the pit.”

“Angie and David used to have the most amazing orgies at Oakley St. Everybody f----- everybody in the pit. Mick Jagger used to come there and be involved with sexual things,” says a source.



Wendy Leigh details glam rocker's torrid sex life in new biography "Bowie."


After Bowie became addicted to cocaine, it was sometimes hard to tell which addiction he was chasing at any given moment. Presumably, when he crowded into the closet of his suite at the Sherry-Netherland hotel on Fifth Ave. in 1974 with Bette Midler and Mick Jagger, he was only after drugs.

But there’s no question that the coke amped up Bowie’s sexual drive. He became “dedicated to having sex with as many partners as possible.”

The guitarist Slash was just 8 years old when he walked into a room at home and found Bowie there with his mother, both stark naked. Ola Hudson, a costume designer, was but one of his many lovers.

Elizabeth Taylor was supposedly another, though Leigh skirts the issue a bit by calling theirs “an amorous friendship.” When he was in L.A., Taylor would call him at the Beverly Wilshire first thing to share gossip and makeup tips.

And while it’s often been rumored that Bowie and Jagger had an affair — indeed Angie claims to have found them in bed together — Leigh additionally claims that Bowie hooked up with both Bianca Jagger and Marianne Faithfull.

Angie could tolerate the dalliance with Faithfull since she was part of their Oakley St. “sexual web,” but she was humiliated when Bowie was photographed with Bianca at a party after she split up with Jagger. Angie saw Bianca as a serious threat.

Ronnie Spector recalls their “dalliance” during his Thin White Duke phase when, after a show at Madison Square Garden in 1976, she was brought to him at The Plaza. The suite was crowded with people, and the coffee table was covered in cocaine, but Spector was taken directly to Bowie in the bedroom, where he waited for her naked.

Around this time, Bowie began denying that he was or ever had been bisexual, claiming it was an image foisted on him by his managers.

It did seem that Bowie was slowing down if not entirely changing his ways. Some disputed that Bowie was actually sleeping with Oona Chaplin, the widow of Charlie Chaplin who was almost 20 years older than Bowie, when he was preparing to play “The Elephant Man” on stage in 1980.



Time & Life Pictures/The LIFE Picture Collection/Gett
Bowie had a fling with actress Susan Sarandon.


Others close to the couple claimed it was true love. Either way, Bowie was also getting busy with Monique van Vooren, the blond, busty star of Warhol’s “Frankenstein,” around the same time. Not long afterward, he took up with Susan Sarandon. Though she was involved with the Italian director Franco Amurri, the affair with Bowie lasted three years.

In “Bowie,” more than one observer characterizes Bowie as a sex addict. It’s true that he has admitted to having an addictive personality and eventually cleaned himself up from drugs. Perhaps, he took care of the sexual issue, too?

It’s also possible that Bowie, who is now 67, just had a voracious appetite for any and many sexual experiences — one that was easily satisfied as an international rock star.

At any rate, he seemed a sated man by the time he met his current wife, fashion model Iman.

In fact, Bowie had already tried for a stable arrangement when he became engaged in 1990 to Melissa Hurley, a ballet dancer 20 years young than him. Later, he characterized their relationship as one of those “older men, younger girl situations” destined not to last.

Then he and Iman were introduced at a party in Los Angeles in the fall of 1990. Bowie later revealed, “I was naming the children the night we met.

“It was so lucky that we were to meet at that time in our lives, when we both were yearning for each other.”

They named their daughter Alexandria Zahra Jones when she was born in 2000. And it would seem that Bowie is a stay-at-home dad. He’s so rarely in the public eye now that some call him a recluse.

Or it could just be that he’s living out his happy-ever-after behind closed doors.

NY Daily News


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MessagePosté le: Ven 19 Sep - 10:44 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Sur ce sujet, beaucoup de choses sont dites dans "Alias Bowie" Mr. Green

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MessagePosté le: Ven 19 Sep - 11:53 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Domi a écrit:
Sur ce sujet, beaucoup de choses sont dites dans "Alias Bowie" Mr. Green




“When we were in bed together, he was more sensual and narcissistic,” says Tony Zanetta, Bowie’s assistant. “To him, it was about being adored. . . . I don’t think sex mattered to him.”


 Cela ne m'étonne guère...un brin narcissique David  Mr. Green  Le sexe et la séduction comme instruments de domination d'un Ego un rien surdimensionné.


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MessagePosté le: Sam 20 Sep - 17:02 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant







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MessagePosté le: Sam 20 Sep - 19:59 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Génial, je voulais justement en parler : d’après la bio de Keith Richards "Life" (que j'ai lue cet été en lézardant sur les maaaagnifiques plages Landaises)  il dit que sa première écoute du morceau "It's Only Rock N Roll" eu lieue dans le studio de Ron Wood ou Mick Jagger était allé l'enregistrer avec David ... le morceau etant tellement bon, il demanda a Mick de le récupérer pour les Stones.
Il paraitrait que dans la version de l'album éponyme les chœurs avec David auraient été conservé ... ?

Info ... intox ... ?


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MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 12:36 (2016)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie

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