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J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
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avcsar
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MessagePosté le: Lun 22 Sep - 12:29 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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MessagePosté le: Lun 22 Sep - 12:29 (2014)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
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zanedog


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MessagePosté le: Lun 22 Sep - 17:39 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

avcsar a écrit:
http://www.davidbowie.com/news/sue-single-update-plus-cover-artwork-reveale…



 Un look vintage, un titre de 7 minutes, une citation de Shakespeare...il nous fait dans le classieux...


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MessagePosté le: Jeu 2 Oct - 08:13 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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zanedog


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MessagePosté le: Sam 4 Oct - 06:11 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

 



Photo de la compilation. 



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Soul-Duke


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MessagePosté le: Sam 4 Oct - 15:39 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

On ne compte plus le nombre d'allusions qui filtrent positivement en référence à Bowie de Robert Fripp à ses membres crimsioniens. Le dernier exemple en date ... by the way be seeing you .... Wink   http://youtu.be/2PIUVF3sowQ

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MessagePosté le: Mar 7 Oct - 20:13 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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lunamagic
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MessagePosté le: Mar 7 Oct - 20:53 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

NME 11 octobre 2014



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MessagePosté le: Mar 7 Oct - 20:56 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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MessagePosté le: Mar 7 Oct - 21:09 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

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MessagePosté le: Jeu 9 Oct - 07:52 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Fripp once more about David Bowie : 


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MessagePosté le: Jeu 9 Oct - 11:33 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



The Modern Electric’s - David Bowie Save Us All (Redux)



PRODOSE.COM





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MessagePosté le: Jeu 9 Oct - 20:36 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



© Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS


The drummers of David Bowie

The great sticksmen who've kept the beat behind Bowie

Chris Burke (Rhythm) 9th Oct 2014 | 15:44


The Drummers of David Bowie

The Thin White Duke knows a thing or two about good drummers

David Bowie certainly knows how to pick a great band, and his drummers are no exception. From Woody Woodmansey, currently back with the Spiders From Mars band, via Dennis Davis and beyond, we round up some of Bowie's best drummers.

Honorable mentions must go also to John Eager (David Bowie, 1967), Terry Cox (David Bowie, 1969) Andy Newmark (Young Americans, 1975) and Hunt Sales (Tin Machine, 1989; Tin Machine, 1991).




© Press

WOODY WOODMANSEY

The Man Who Sold The World (1970, Hunky Dory (1971), The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars (1972), Aladdin Sane (1973)

Mick 'Woody' Woodmansey joined Bowie's band in 1970 at the dawn of what would be the Spiders From Mars era, with Mick Ronson and Tony Visconti. It was a glam-rock supergroup, behind a musical genius with a spontaneous vision, as Woody recalls. "Sometimes [Bowie] would say, 'We're going in on Monday to start the album.' We'd go, 'What tracks?' And he'd go, 'Well, we'll have a go at blah-de-blah and blah-de-blah.' You get in there and he'd go, 'No, we're not doing that. I've just finished this one. We're doing this.'

The band rarely ever did more than three takes and at times Bowie wouldn't even want that many. "'The Jean Genie', that was first take," says Woody. "In the beginning, Trevor [Bolder, who took over from Tony Visconti on bass], Mick and I would go into the control room, hear it back, and go, 'Oh yeah, I've got it now. I wasn't quite sure what happened there, let's go do it.' And Bowie would go, 'No, that's it.' 'What do you mean?' 'That's the take'. 'No, that's the first time we've played it!' Trevor would go, 'Yeah, there's a bum note right in the middle.' 'Let me hear it.' And you can hear the bum note and he goes, 'Yeah, I like it.'"

"There is something in that newness, you're creating at that point," adds Woody. "It can be better played with a better sound and tighter, but it doesn't have that newness, that freshness, and really that's what you're trying to get. You're looking for that magic any time you go in a studio. He knew that. I don't know how he knew that, but he was right. When we did 'Life On Mars', I remember Ken Scott saying, 'Come up and listen to the mix,' and we heard it on these incredible massive speakers and our mouths just dropped open. Did we play that? Is that us? I don't know if the audience is ready for that. It was so different we didn't actually know."




© Alex Solca

AYNSLEY DUNBAR

Pin-Ups (1973), Diamond Dogs (1974)

A fantastic player and rock drumming journeyman, Aynsley was fresh from the always-impressive Frank Zappa gig when the call came to drum for David Bowie. Bowie's covers album, Pin-Ups, was first, featuring most of the Spiders From Mars band minus Mick Woodmansey, followed by 1974's Diamond Dogs.

"When I was with Frank Zappa," recalls Dunbar. "Jim Pons, the bass player, loved David Bowie's music so he gave me tapes to listen to. I really enjoyed the pop songs Bowie was doing. I was recording the Berlin album with Lou Reed and had a day off. Bowie called me at the hotel in London and asked me if I would like to go to the show that night and sit in with Jeff Beck. I said, 'I'd love to, let me call Lou and see if he wants to come.' I called Lou and he immediately decided he was going to call a session that night. We went to the studio and spent four hours doing absolutely nothing! I told Lou, 'You better come with me to the party afterwards,' which I was invited to. Lou and Bowie weren't best of friends at that point and had a little bit of a problem. We sat down at the table and started laughing and joking and finally Bowie and Lou relaxed and managed to give each other a hug. That's when Bowie asked me to join the band. I liked Bowie and I liked the music, so I got the gig."




DENNIS DAVIS

Station To Station (1976), Low (1977), Heroes (1977), Lodger (1979), Scary Monsters (1980)

One of many New York drummers Bowie has played with over the years, Dennis formed an unbeatable rhythm section with bass player George Murray on much of Bowie's 1970s output.

Dennis had great pedigree - he studied with Elvin Jones and Max Roach, and his contributions to the likes of Station To Station and Heroes is well worth paying close attention to.



© Press

OMAR HAKIM

Let's Dance (1983)

Omar's had some pretty big gigs, all told – including, most recently, Kate Bush – but he first came to prominence when he filled the Weather Report drum stool vacated by Peter Erskine. Round about this time, Omar was recruited by producer Nile Rodgers to play on David Bowie's Let's Dance, a record that opened a lot of doors in the pop world.

"Sometimes musicians get typecast, so if they see you playing jazz, they say you're a jazz drummer," says Omar. "When //Let's Dance//

came out it was so the complete opposite of everything else that I was doing that it didn't even sound like the same drummer. I think it was perfect for my career. Sting said to me, 'One of the first places I heard you was the David Bowie album.' It was like a dream come true. because of all these different projects it was impossible for people to typecast me."

Playing for Bowie, Omar was introduced to the pop charts thanks to the hits 'Modern Love' and 'China Girl'. "Let's Dance shows the rock side of me in a really good way," says Omar. "Niles playing rhythm guitar, Stevie Ray Vaughan playing the solos, Carmine Bojas on bass, it was a killer rhythm section."




© Roger Kisby/Rhythm

STERLING CAMPBELL

Black Tie, White Noise (1993), Heathen (2002), Outside (1995), 'Hours…' (1999), Reality (2003), The Next Day (2013)

For the last 20 years Sterling, alongside Zachary Alford, has been one of Bowie's go-to drummers, appearing on record on Black Tie, White Noise in 1993 and Bowie's most recent album 2013's The Next Day. Asked what Bowie demands from his drummers, Sterling told Rhythm:

"He doesn't really ask anything; there's a song, he plays it. I went into my Bowie banks. I'm not going to lie, I studied it. I listened to everything that Dennis did, as time went on I got a lot deeper into listening, my ears got better, so I went back – especially on the last Bowie tour I would really listen to Woody on Ziggy, and try to cop as much as I can because that's such a time and a place, man. If you listen, some of it's almost verbatim when I played it live. It's really just to honour it, it's so perfect as it is."




© Frank Ockenfels

ZACHARY ALFORD

Earthling (1997), The Next Day (2013)

New Yorker Zack started drumming at 10 years old, influenced by a rich musical heritage in his Manhattan neighbourhood – one particularly packed with drumming talent. Poogie Bell was his first instructor, and he also lived within a few blocks of now-fellow Bowie drummer Sterling Campbell. Zack played on Bowie's '90s album Earthling and shared drum duties with Sterling Campbell on Bowie's 2013 The Next Day.




OCTOBER RHYTHM OUT NOW!

Simon Phillips, Woody Woodmansey and other great drummers can be found in October's Rhythm

Read more about Bowie drummer Woody Woodmansey reforming the Spiders From Mars and his recollections of working with the Thin White Duke in October's Rhythm, out now to buy in all good newsagents, online from Myfavouritemagazines.com and on iPad from Apple Newsstand.

MusicRadar


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lunamagic
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MessagePosté le: Ven 10 Oct - 15:29 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant





David Bowie : un article dans le mag, une playlist sur le site

Par Bertrand Rocher 10 oct. 2014 - 11h20

Et si vous lisiez l'article que votre magazine consacre à la riche carrière sentimentale de Bowie (ci-dessus avec Susan Sarandon en 2006) en écoutant la compile que Grazia.fr vous a concocté ?

Grazia

Vous pouvez écouter notre sélection de tubes et autres titres moins connus du génial David sur Spotify ou directement ci-dessous :





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MessagePosté le: Ven 10 Oct - 15:32 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant







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MessagePosté le: Ven 10 Oct - 16:22 (2014)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



Drexel houses part of legendary rocker David Bowie's five-decade career in the basement of University Crossings. Photo by Adam Bielawski


How Did Drexel End Up With Rare David Bowie Recordings?

By: Alissa Falcone
October 6, 2014

The “David Bowie Is” retrospective exhibit newly opened at the Chicago Museum of Modern Art is full of gems from the rock performer’s archives —handwritten lyrics, original costumes and album artwork that the legendary musician donated for all to see. But there’s one tiny part of Bowie’s five-decade legacy that is currently inconspicuously shelved in a basement of a building on Drexel’s campus.

From August to November of 1974, Bowie recorded part of his ninth studio album, “Young Americans,” at Philadephia’s Sigma Sound Studios. But only one tape from the sessions remained in the studio’s archive when its 6,200 master tapes were donated to Drexel in 2005. Now the tape is part of the Sigma Sound Studios Collection in the Drexel University Audio Archives, housed in the basement of University Crossings.

The assortment of tapes helps tell the story of Philly music from just before the founding of the studio (in 1968) to 1996, when Sigma switched from using analog tapes to digital recording. In the early ‘70s, the studio was known for producing Philly soul and “The Sound of Philadelphia,” and Bowie, who was known for his glam rock albums and personas, was looking for a change.

“Imagine it's 1974. Sigma was hot. Coming out of Philly and coming out of Sigma was hit record after hit record,” said Toby Seay, project director of the Audio Archives and an associate professor in the Westphal College of Media Arts & Design. “It would be very enticing for an artist like Bowie to say, ‘Let’s go there and see if some of that ‘magic’ wears off.’”



Toby Seay, project director of Drexel's Audio Archives and an associate professor in the Westphal College, happily shows off "Reel 4."


The session’s remaining 16-track tape, dated August 14, 1974, and labeled “Reel 4,” contains just five songs. These include alternate takes of songs that made the album, like reworked versions of the title track, and rejected songs that only appear on reissues, like “John, I’m Only Dancing (Again),” “It’s Gonna Be Me” and “Who Can I Be Now.” The single sheet of paper accompanying the tape only lists the tracks, takes, times and instruments used — no dates, no musician names and no inventory of its place alongside other possible tapes from the Bowie sessions.

Of course, the album is far from unknown. “Young Americans” reached the Top 10 List in America and the song “Fame,” which was later co-written and featured vocals from John Lennon in New York City, was Bowie’s first No. 1 single in America. But the records from the smash hit are less prominent.

“Bowie had the forethought from the very beginning to own his recordings. That's so rare,” said Seay. “From what I understand, he knows where every tape of every record he's recorded exists except for "Young Americans’ and ‘Station to Station.’”

The whereabouts of reels 1, 2, 3 and any possible recordings after reel 4 were unknown when Seay first started cataloging the collection. But that all changed when he discovered a seemingly inconsequential tape labeled “DB.” Upon listening, he realized it was actually a recording of a studio session in which “DB,” or “David Bowie,” and his musicians are heard chatting, going over song parts, and practicing “Who Can I Be Now” and “John, I’m Only Dancing (Again).”

“I don't know what enticed me to pull it off the shelf, but something did. And since then, I've looked for other tapes that might be labeled that and there aren't any,” Seay said.



Reel 4 of the "Young American" sessions.


At one point during the hour-long recording, Bowie asks backup singer Luther Vandross, who later won eight Grammy Awards for his solo career, to come in stronger on the “Who” in “Who Can I be Now.” After demonstrating the kind of vocal he wanted, Bowie self-deprecatingly tells Vandross, "I mean, I'm not as good as you, but you know what I mean."

“I don't know how illicit this was, but somebody just rolled a reel of tape in the studio while they were working,” Seay said. “Even though they’re making music in a studio, after a while you get that it's just people doing their job.”

It’s a revealing look into Bowie’s creative process, and the sessions as a whole. Additional insight into the sessions became clearer once Seay received copies of reels 1 and 2 — on behalf of Bowie himself.

Several years ago, Bowie discovered the tapes on ebay and arranged for the sender to give them to him. But first they were sent to Seay to be digitized, since he had previously sent Bowie the digital copies of the fourth reel. In exchange, Drexel kept digital copies of the newly discovered reels — so those recordings can only be found only in Bowie’s personal collection and Drexel’s collection.

Those tapes include other versions of songs heard on reel 4 and the secret recording, but there are also some surprises. Two tracks, “Lazer” and “Shilling the Rubes,” have never been released on any Bowie compilation or album.

While the physical Bowie tape is an important, and notable, part of the collection, and the “plastic soul” Bowie recorded was influenced by Philly soul, the collection has many other tapes from local artists and producers that round out the archive’s historical and cultural significance. Even though Bowie recorded in the Philly studio, he brought in New York studio sessions players and his producer, instead of using the Sigma Sound engineers and musicians.

Unfortunately, all of the Bowie tracks, and the thousands of others in the collection, can’t be put online by Drexel, which owns the physical rights, rather than the copyrights, on the tapes. Instead, Seay is working on a digital database of the tapes so people know what they can listen to at the studio, though it’s an arduous process involving digitizing and cataloging works.

Besides Bowie, there are tapes from Patti LaBelle, Teddy Pendergrass, Gladys Knight and many other artists. Who knows just what other treasures are hiding in the archives?

Drexel University


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MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 01:09 (2016)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie

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