Manofmusic Index du Forum

Manofmusic
Espace consacré à David Bowie et à la Culture sous toutes ses formes

 FAQFAQ   RechercherRechercher   MembresMembres   GroupesGroupes   S’enregistrerS’enregistrer 
 ProfilProfil   Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privésSe connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés   ConnexionConnexion 

J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
Aller à la page: <  1, 2, 319, 20, 21148, 149, 150  >
 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 09:47 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Oui, comme je pense que Bowie n'a jamais repris (sur scène, en disque) la chanson (qui est finalement devenu) "My Way"... je pense qu'il se trompe ou demande s'il ne se tromperait pas.
_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 09:47 (2012)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 10:01 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

http://www.lesinrocks.com/2012/04/05/musique/david-jones-even-a-fool-learns…


Excusez-moi, j'avais mis le lien... mais il fallait le copier-coller.

Pour que je me fasse bien comprendre, voici, sa notule :


"Un court document rare et cocasse : en 1968, un jeune songwriter inconnu de Londres reçoit la mission d’adapter en anglais le Comme d’Habitude de Claude François.
Il trouve bien le titre (Even a Fool Learns To Love) mais au bout de dix jours, jette l’éponge (après avoir inlassablement chanté sur l’original !). Devenu David Bowie, il se souviendra de cette progression d’accords pour son propre Life On Mars.
La chanson, elle, deviendra My Way et l’un des plus gros tubes mondiaux de l’histoire, repris par Sinatra, Presley, Sid Vicious ou… Bowie."
_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 10:04 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

En plus, est-ce qu'il "jette l'éponge" ou voit sa version refusée ?
_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 10:07 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Nicolas Pegg cite Ken Pitt : "Their attitude was that they wanted a star to record the song, not this yobbo from Bromley" !!!
_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 10:14 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Ah, Lunamagic, si, je vois sur ta propre liste des "covers" faites par Bowie qu'il a bien chanté "My Way" !
_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 10:56 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant






EVEN A FOOL LEARNS TO LOVE


To have their picture and details published in Spotlight, the casting directory, is, next to becoming famous, the cherished wish of most young actors and actresses. Few beginners can afford to, so they beg, borrow or steal, or submit to sugardaddies. David had to do neither, not that he had ever heard of Spotlight or cared about being in it. Now that he was beginning to obtain acting work on the stage and in television I knew that an entry in Spotlight would increase his chances of further engagements, so I took a quarter-page space in the Spring and Autumn issues, using one of Robin Bean's photographs.

Early in February there was a sequence of events that, if they had been allowed to develop, would have led to David receiving his first real recognition as a writer of lyrics and to the clearing of the impasse at Decca. Geoffrey Heath, the head of Good Music, a publishing firm affiliated to Essex Music, had just returned from Paris where he had heard a song called Comme d'Habitude, written by Claude François and Jaques Ivoux. The original French publisher gave Geoffrey a short option on the UK publishing rights to the song and Geoffrey had been trying to get a suitable English lyric written, but with no success. Even Gordon Mills, Tom Jones's manager, had a stab at it, but neither he nor Jones was sufficiently pleased with the result for Jones to record it. Then David Platz suggested that David Bowie be invited to submit a lyric. Geoffrey sent me a copy of Claude François's own recording of the song and David, enchanted by the melody, immediately and enthusiastically began to put into words the images it suggested to him. As he progressed it was becoming clear that he was writing a song that could and should be his next single. I had long formed the view that the solution to David's flagging recording career would be for him to write a lyric to a strong melody composed by someone else, and he seemed not to be adverse to this. The suggestion also met with a smile from Decca.

When David had completed his lyric, which he called Even a fool learns to love, he proceeded to make a simple demonstration recording. T his he did by singing to the accompaniment of the Claude François single, the sound of which was picked up by David's voice microphone and can faintly be heard in the background. On February 9 I took the lyric to Essex Music and a few days later to Decca. Plans were going ahead for David to record the song, but then we heard that the French publisher had raised a strong objection to his doing so. "Their attitude was that they wanted a star to record the song, not this yobbo from Bromley," said Geoffrey Heath, whose option on the song then expired.

Some time later, during one of his visits home, David telephoned me and said "Frank Sinatra's recorded that French song; I've just heard it on the radio." For a brief and blissful moment I thought that Sinatra had recorded David's lyric, but he had not. It was a completely different lyric and was called My Way.
Soon after David had been rebuffed by the French publisher, Geoffrey Heath left Good Music and went to the Shapiro, Bernstein publishing company, where he was once again asked to see what he could do with Comme d'Habitude. This time he didn't bother about an English lyric, but sent the original French version to Jimmy Bowen, who was producing the recordings of Keely Smith and Frank Sinatra. Bowen played the François record to arranger and musical director Don Costa who, in turn, played it to Paul Anka. Anka wrote the My Way lyric and either he or Costa, or both, took the song to Sinatra. I often wonder what would have happened if Comme d'Habitude had gone to Sinatra complete with David's English lyric, which is published here for the first time.

There was a time, the laughing time
I took my heart to every party
They'd point my way
"How are you today?"
"Will you make us laugh? Chase our blues away?"
Their funny man won't let them down
No, he'd dance and prance and be their clown
That time, that laughing time
When even a fool learns to love

The clown turned around
And saw her smile, Oh how she loved me
She'd clap her hands and beg me stay
To make her laugh, to make her life gay
Who wants the love of all the world
When here was love in the eyes of just one girl
That day, that precious day
When even a fool learns to love

But Oh, how I dreamed, a marvellous dream
Where all of the heavens or so it had seemed
With thunderous applause looked down from above
On a clown and an angel so much in love
I'll stay with my dream, it takes such a dream
And even a fool learns to love

That day, that hateful day
The joke turned stale, the game was over
Those spiteful words "Oh, go away. Who wants to play?"
"It's getting late now."
My world, my funny world
Had lost its mask and shown a broken heart
A time, a sour time
When even a fool learns to cry

But Oh, how I dreamed, a marvellous dream
Where all of the heavens or so it had seemed
With thunderous applause looked down from above
On a clown and an angel so much in love
I'll stay with my dream, it takes such a dream
And even a fool learns to love

© 1968 Westminster Music Ltd.

Kenneth Pitrt - David Bowie • The Pitt Report



EVEN A FOOL LEARNS TO LOVE
(François/Thibault/Revaux/Bowie)

In February 1968, while David's Decca career was beginning to stall, Kenneth Pitt busied himself finding work for his client writing English lyrics for overseas music publishers. One of the songs that fell in Bowie's lap was 'Comme D'Habitude' by Claude François, Gilles Thibault and Jacques Revaux. As he began putting English lyrics to the song, in Pitt's words "it was becoming clear that he was writing a song that could and should be his next single."

Bowie's English version, 'Even A Fool Learns To Love' (a "pitifully awful title", he laughed many years later), was committed to a rough-and-ready demo which merely involved David singing over the original Claude François recording. Bowie's lyrics owed much to his then involvement with Lindsay Kemp's mime company, and perhaps a little to his new girlfriend Hermione Farthingale, telling how the easy laughter won by a clown is subjugated by the sudden arrival of love: "The clown turned around and saw her smile, oh how she loved me J She'd clap her hands and beg me stay I To make her laugh, to make her life gay I Who wants the love of all the world when here was love in the eyes of just one girl I That day, that precious day / When even a fool learns to love."

On 9 February Pitt took the demo to his publishers at Essex Music and later to Decca, but plans for David to record the single were dashed when the French publisher raised an objection. As Essex Music's affiliate Geoffrey Heath recalled, "Their attitude was that they wanted a star to record the song, not this yobbo from Bromley." Not long afterwards Paul Anka's American translation immortalized the selfsame song as none other than 'My Way'. An extract of Bowie's demo was later aired in BBC2's Arena documentary about the number that became Frank Sinatra's signature tune.

Referred to in some documentation under the alternative title 'Reprise', 'Even A Fool Learns To Love' was included in Bowie's abortive 1968 cabaret show. David later paid tribute to 'My Way' and its most famous interpreter with his classic composition 'Life On Mars?', a reworking of the same chord sequence that was, in the words of Hunky Dory's sleeve-notes, "inspired by Frankie".

Nicholas Pegg - The Complete David Bowie


Dernière édition par lunamagic le Jeu 5 Avr - 11:10 (2012); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Nightflight
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 05 Mar 2011
Messages: 1 393

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 11:06 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Merci. Ce serait donc Geoffrey Heath et non Ken Pitt qui aurait dit à propos du refus français : "Their attitude was that they wanted a star to record the song, not this yobbo from Bromley" !!!
_________________
"We Are The Dead"

"I want to live"


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 11:09 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

Nightflight a écrit:
Ah, Lunamagic, si, je vois sur ta propre liste des "covers" faites par Bowie qu'il a bien chanté "My Way" !

J'ai manqué de précision ! My Way n'est que la version anglaise de Comme d'Habitude.
J'aurais dû écrire My Way (English version of Comme d'Habitude) !


Revenir en haut
Thinwhitedude


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 25 Fév 2012
Messages: 104
Localisation: Marseille

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 11:40 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



Revenir en haut
Thinwhitedude


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 25 Fév 2012
Messages: 104
Localisation: Marseille

MessagePosté le: Jeu 5 Avr - 11:47 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

http://www.sendspace.com/file/7w47px

Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Lun 9 Avr - 18:31 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant



La influencia del grunge, en su caso muy lejana, se percibe sin embargo en un 'casual look' GYI


Cuando David Bowie se transformó en Ziggy
Hace cuarenta años se publicó una de las leyendas del glam rock y de David Bowie | En el disco, David Bowie da un vuelco camaleónico a su música y personaje | Ziggy Stardust era el álter ego andrógino de Bowie en forma de personaje de ficción

Música | 09/04/2012 - 00:00h

Esteban Linés
Barcelona


David Bowie es uno de los artistas más agradecidos para los focos mediáticos, tanto por contrastada calidad artística, por su incomparable desenvoltura dentro y fuera del escenario y, también, por el morbo que despierta su retirada del panorama musical desde que fuese operado del corazón en 2004, los rumores sobre su estado de salud o sobre su potencial regreso. A ello se suma ahora el cuarenta aniversario de la aparición en el mercado de uno de los discos más determinantes de su carrera, The rise and fall of Ziggy Stardust and the spiders from Mars, obra que caracterizó su vertiente más camaleónica y una de las referencias del glam rock de los años setenta.

Más allá de especulaciones, la obra de Bowie (Brixton, 1947) fue rupturista formal y visualmente, mientras que musicalmente buscó aunar esencias poperas con una energía que ya anunciaba la contundencia punk. Un álbum y una obra que marcaron a contemporáneos como Lou Reed o Iggy Pop y a infinidad de músicos posteriores de toda condición como Echo and The Bunnymen, Gary Glitter, Radiohead, Air o Lady Gaga, por citar un puñado heterogéneo. A Bowie se le comenzó a ver en España gracias a los esfuerzos del promotor Gay Mercader, que le montó dos conciertos en el Mini Estadi en julio de 1987. "Hacía años que lo quería traer y al final lo pude hacer gracias a Brian Eno, amigo común. En Madrid pinchó y aquí me costó mucho", recuerda. También lo hace Jaume Sisa, que rememora que un año antes de la aparición de Ziggy Stardust "había abandonado el grupo Música Dispersa y estaba intentando grabar un disco; me encontraba en un pozo, en todos los sentidos de la palabra. En aquella época escuchaba lo habitual como Pink Floyd, Frank Zappa o la Incredible String Band, y en ese sentido David Bowie no era un gran santo de mi devoción. Para mi gusto personal en aquella época era sinónimo de demasiado circo y glamur, aunque el álbum es uno de los clásicos de los setenta". El productor, cantante y músico Marc Parrot adelanta que descubrió "a Bowie de mayor, y fue una revelación. Tanto por el talento que él atesoraba, tan dotado como cantante y compositor, como por ser creador de espectáculos, por su look. El disco Ziggy Stardust tenía unas referencias claras del rock clásico, de los cincuenta, y él fue y le dio la vuelta".

Bowie, además de otras cosas, representaba el lado intelectual del glam, había alumbrado ya un puñado de magníficos elepés (Space oddity, The man who sold the world, Hunky dory...) y en 1972 se encontraba en una de las cúspides de su carrera: produjo a Lou Reed y a Mott the Hopple, y creó un personaje de ficción galáctica para sus nuevas canciones, que acabó editando en el disco The rise and fall of Ziggy... (RCA).

El disco fue la materialización de un complejo engranaje donde destacaba el guitarrista Mick Ronson, sobre el que descansaban las canciones escritas por Bowie. Apareció en el mercado en junio de 1972 junto a su primer single, un aclamado Starman que para muchos es paradigma del glam rock más heroico, Pero lo más característico del disco, sin duda, es que el personaje se come al cantante. Entonces fue Ziggy Stardust, andrógino álter ego del propio Bowie, el personaje fantástico ideado, pero antes y después aparecieron otras creaciones memorables: Major Tom (protagonista de la imborrable Space oddity, 1969), Aladdin Sane (de hecho, una evolución de Ziggy, 1973) o Thin White Duke (personaje impecablemente ataviado de en Station to station, 1976).

El recurso del personaje de ficción es algo íntimamente asociado a esa vocación camaleónica que determina cualquier valoración de su obra. Marc Parrot considera que "Bowie ha sido imprevisible por su capacidad de ir siempre un paso más allá de lo que solía hacer un intérprete de rock típico. De hecho, él era capaz de romper el cliché del rock y del pop desde muchos puntos de vista, y eso es algo único". En la misma dirección se posiciona Gay Mercader: "Los grupos y cantantes de entonces, en el mejor de los casos, navegaban con los tiempos pero siempre manteniendo una identidad propia, como hacían los Stones, pero reinventarse completamente de vez en cuando no lo hace cualquiera".

En cualquier caso, la trascendencia de este álbum fue prolongada. Para Santiago Auserón, por ejemplo, que recuerda que "en aquella época yo era dylaniano, pero mi hermano Luis era mucho más abierto y a través de él supe del glam británico y de la Velvet Underground. En un primer momento, tanto Lou Reed como David Bowie no me gustaron por su amaneramiento, sobre todo visual. Pero cuando apareció Ziggy Stardust me quedé deslumbrado. Allí la guitarra de Mick Ronson tiene una importancia capital, y si a ese poderío guitarrero le añades calidad melódica, energía en la interpretación y elegancia vocal, te sale una obra mayúscula, gloriosa".

La Vanguardia



El músico británico revolucionó la escena musical
en los 60 con los vestuarios que incorporó a las
giras de 'The man who sold the world' o de
'The rise and fall of Ziggy Stardust' GYI


Revenir en haut
avcsar
Invité

Hors ligne




MessagePosté le: Sam 21 Avr - 16:11 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

---------

Dernière édition par avcsar le Lun 28 Déc - 13:11 (2015); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Sam 21 Avr - 19:30 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant




No. 29: David Bowie, ‘Space Oddity’ – Top 100 Classic Rock Songs
by: Karen 'Gilly' Laney

David Bowie’s ‘Space Oddity’ has landed firmly in our Top 100 Classic Rock Songs partly because its lead character, Major Tom, has aged exceptionally well — considering everything he’s been through.

Now in his forties, he’s gone from the dude floating around in a tin can to an iconic space-suited-survivor, and even the start of his very own children’s book.

Inspired by Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece film ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ the song’s storyline captures an alluring and ultimately alarming conversation that takes place between Ground Control and astronaut Major Tom, who’s been blasted into outer space.

‘Space Oddity’ has a rich history; musically and culturally, partially thanks to its release coinciding with the actual moon landing in 1969. In fact, it was this event that motivated album producer Tony Visconti to decline getting involved with its recording.

He apparently considered the timing somewhat of a gimmick, and though he went on to produce the rest of Bowie’s self-titled album, Gus Dudgeon gets the producer credit here.

The song starts the sounds of a spaceship lifting off, a dramatic effect pulled off successfully thanks to guitarist Mick Wayne’s use of a chrome-plated, cigarette lighter. Soon enough, Tom finds himself a hero in orbit, with the papers demanding to know whose shirts he wears. Of course, as well all know by now, the mission doesn’t go according to plan, and our brave explorer finds himself lost — intentionally? — in the stars forever.

Bowie has written a number of songs that could give ‘Space Oddity’ a run for its money (including its sequel, ‘Ashes To Ashes’) but when it comes to picking just one, we’re sticking by the character who took his protein pills and sacrificed his own life to satisfy our innate curiosity about the worlds beyond our own.


Listen to ‘Space Oddity’ by David Bowie


ultimateclassicrock.com


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Sam 21 Avr - 21:28 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant

‘Horrible Bosses’ Director Attached to David Bowie-Inspired Comedy ‘Ground Control to Major Tom’
Posted on Friday, April 20th, 2012 by Russ Fischer


David Bowie has been in semi-retirement for a while now, but he remains a cultural force. Just days ago we saw Michael Fassbender doing his best Bowie as the android David 8 in a promo video for Ridley Scott’s Alien prequel Prometheus. His impersonation is uncanny.

Now Bowie is cropping up in a more direct manner, as Disney has just spent a good amount of money on a romantic comedy script called Ground Control to Major Tom. The title references one of Bowie’s most famous songs, ‘Space Oddity,’ but what that really means for the film is unclear at this point.

/Film


Revenir en haut
lunamagic
Administrateur

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 09 Mar 2011
Messages: 5 102

MessagePosté le: Dim 22 Avr - 08:58 (2012)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Répondre en citant


David Bowie at the height of his Ziggy Stardust period


MY NOTE-PERFECT JOURNEY FROM ABBEY ROAD TO DAVID BOWIE
Sunday April 22, 2012
By Sandro Monetti

KEN SCOTT has witnessed it all while working with the biggest names in pop, from Sir Elton John’s hissy fits to Sir Paul McCartney’s perfectionism. Now the veteran recording engineer and producer is telling all in a book about his incredible career in the studio with David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Duran Duran and dozens more.

As a talented teenage recording engineer at Abbey Road the Londoner worked on classic recordings by The Beatles, winning their confidence and getting an insight into their complex personalities.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of their first hit singles and Ken says: “The big difference between Lennon and McCartney was attitude. Paul always liked to be liked, John couldn’t give a damn what people thought of him, he was everything you have ever read about him. John could kiss you one hour and tell you to **** off the next.

“Paul was the big perfectionist. He would always push for another take. I had no problem with that as I was making good money from the overtime so never wanted to go home but John got bored in the studio and wanted things to move faster.”

Ken was an apprentice of Beatles producer George Martin, later stepping up to producing, working with David Bowie on Ziggy Stardust (The Rise And Fall of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars, to give the album its full title). In fact, Bowie dubbed him “my own George Martin”.

The big difference between Lennon and McCartney was attitude. Paul always liked to be liked, John couldn’t give a damn what people thought of him

Ken Scott

Ken says: “I learned from George that you don’t micromanage artists. You allow them to do what they are good at, to let them try whatever they want or to give them enough rope to hang themselves.

“When David explained The Rise And Fall of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars and how he wanted it to be more rock’n’roll like Iggy Pop or The Velvet Underground I hadn’t heard of either artist, but we worked it out and David was such a professional on that; 95 per cent of his vocals were done on the very first take.”

The pair are still friends today. “I e-mailed David to congratulate him on his 65th birthday and reaching the same age as me and David messaged back: ‘What do you mean? I’m only 37!’”

After making his mark with Bowie, Ken was brought in by “up and coming singer” Elton John to help him record Rocket Man and other tracks which were to become timeless. It was clear even then, he says, that Elton was something of a diva.

“Elton wants to be a winner and hates to lose at anything. Back then we had a table football tournament between everyone working on his team and I got to beat Elton in the final. I did think about letting my boss win but couldn’t do it and I won regardless of how long it took.”

By now Ken was in demand and worked with Lou Reed, Jeff Beck, Supertramp, Harry Nilsson even, briefly, The Rolling Stones.

He was at the forefront of the sex, drugs and rock’n’roll era but didn’t see much of the first two: “I missed all that because I was working so much. The sex part I would have enjoyed but not drugs.”

Ken says: “I remember working with Mick Jagger once and him turning up seeming very tired as if he’d been out all night. That wHasn’t me. I was too busy working to go out partying.”

HE NOW lives in Los Angeles with his American wife Cheryl, a hospice nurse, and has chronicled his amazing career in the forthcoming book Abbey Road To Ziggy Stardust, to be released in America on June 6, the 50th anniversary of the day the Beatles first walked into the recording studio.

“It is also the 40th anniversary of the Ziggy Stardust album so this year seemed the perfect time to bring out a book of my memories,” says Ken.

Looking back over his career now, though, he admits to not rating the results of all those recording sessions as highly as some. “I really don’t know what all the fuss was about with the Ziggy Stardust album and never remotely thought it would be enjoyed 40 years later,” he says, indeed he doesn’t even rate The Beatles as the greatest of all time.

“Their albums are a piece of history but Paul once said the Beatles were just ‘a good little rock’n’roll band’ and I tend to agree with that.”

Who is his favourite then? American band The Foo Fighters. “[Foo Fighters singer] Dave Grohl is amazing,” he says.

Most 65-year-old men would not entertain listening to the alternative rock band but then Ken Scott isn’t your typical 65-year-old man. “Even though I’ve reached retirement age, I will never leave the studio and retire,” he insists. “The perfect ending to my life would come when I was pressing down the fader on the greatest song of all time. What a way to go!”

Daily Express


Revenir en haut
Contenu Sponsorisé






MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 12:34 (2016)    Sujet du message: J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie

Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Manofmusic Index du Forum -> David Bowie -> J'ai entendu un truc sur David Bowie Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 1 Heure
Aller à la page: <  1, 2, 319, 20, 21148, 149, 150  >
Page 20 sur 150

 
Sauter vers:  

Index | Panneau d’administration | creer un forum gratuit | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com